A Woman with a broken pot of flowers thumbnail 1
A Woman with a broken pot of flowers thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 145

A Woman with a broken pot of flowers

Figure
ca. 1760s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Of all the French faience factories, Niderviller produced the finest figures. The first were produced during the late 1750s, and were indebted to the designs of the factory at Strasbourg. The 1760s saw a marked development in the factory's repertoire, with new models introduced by the sculptor Philippe Arnold . These were supplemented, after 1778, with further additons by Charles Sauvage, called 'Lemire', who brought numerous models from the factory at Lunéville, where he had previously worked alongside Cyfflé.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Tin-glazed earthenware painted in colours
Brief Description
Tin-glazed earthenware figure of a woman with a broken pot of flowers, painted in colours, Niderviller pottery and porcelain factory, France, about 1760-1770
Physical Description
Tin-glazed earthenware figure of a woman with a broken pot of flowers, painted in colours.
Gallery Label
Gallery 128 Decant 2003 The figure is after a model by Paul-Louis Cyfflé (1704-1806)(07/06/2004)
Object history
Bought from the Aigion Collection

Acquisition type: Purchase
Production
Acquired as Luneville, 3rd quarter of the 18th century; reattributed to Niderviller, Bayerlé period (before 1770). Stuart G. Davis commented (note in register) that this figure and another of a girl with a goat are fairly conclusive proof that Niderviller was using Cyfflé models before the sale of his models in 1780 as both are known in Terre-de-Lorraine with Cyfflé's early mark CYFFLE A LUNEVILLE.
Subjects depicted
Summary
Of all the French faience factories, Niderviller produced the finest figures. The first were produced during the late 1750s, and were indebted to the designs of the factory at Strasbourg. The 1760s saw a marked development in the factory's repertoire, with new models introduced by the sculptor Philippe Arnold . These were supplemented, after 1778, with further additons by Charles Sauvage, called 'Lemire', who brought numerous models from the factory at Lunéville, where he had previously worked alongside Cyfflé.
Collection
Accession Number
477-1870

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record createdJune 7, 2004
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