Tiara Comb thumbnail 1
Tiara Comb thumbnail 2
+9
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Tiara Comb

1903-4 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The Art Nouveau style caused a dramatic shift in jewellery design, reaching a peak around 1900 when it triumphed at the Paris International Exhibition.

Its followers created sinuous, organic pieces whose undercurrents of eroticism and death were a world away from the floral motifs of earlier generations. Art Nouveau jewellers like René Lalique also distanced themselves from conventional precious stones and put greater emphasis on the subtle effects of materials such as glass, horn and enamel.

René Lalique, 'the admitted king of Paris fashions', chose his materials for aesthetic effect and artistic refinement, not for mere preciousness or brilliance. Credited with introducing horn into the jewellery repertoire, he dazzled the public with a collection of ornamental combs made of horn. They were moulded and sculpted in the shape of flowers, waves and butterflies.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Horn, cast glass, enamelled gold and fire opals
Brief Description
Tiara comb, horn, cast glass, enamelled gold and fire opals. Designed and made by René-Jules Lalique, Paris, 1903-4.
Physical Description
Lalique hair and bodice ornaments.
Style
Summary
The Art Nouveau style caused a dramatic shift in jewellery design, reaching a peak around 1900 when it triumphed at the Paris International Exhibition.



Its followers created sinuous, organic pieces whose undercurrents of eroticism and death were a world away from the floral motifs of earlier generations. Art Nouveau jewellers like René Lalique also distanced themselves from conventional precious stones and put greater emphasis on the subtle effects of materials such as glass, horn and enamel.



René Lalique, 'the admitted king of Paris fashions', chose his materials for aesthetic effect and artistic refinement, not for mere preciousness or brilliance. Credited with introducing horn into the jewellery repertoire, he dazzled the public with a collection of ornamental combs made of horn. They were moulded and sculpted in the shape of flowers, waves and butterflies.
Collection
Accession Number
M.116A-1966

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record createdApril 19, 2004
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