Not currently on display at the V&A

Hanging Scroll

19th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Two cranes and two young chicks stand beneath the sprawling branch of a pine tree in this Korean hanging scroll from the 19th century. The scroll is an example of Korean folk painting (minhwa) and demonstrates the kaleidoscope of colour and exuberance of form typical of the genre. Found in the formal settings of palaces as well as in the homes of aristocrats and commoners, folk paintings have a strong connection with the lives of ordinary people.

During the Choson period (1392–1910), folk paintings took as their subjects a wide range of motifs. The subject matter depended on the sex, age and social standing of the person in whose room the painting was to be displayed. Paintings of birds and flowers often decorated women’s quarters, whereas images of books and scholars’ utensils were appropriate for a scholar’s study. The pine-and-crane motif occurs frequently in East Asian art and is associated with longevity. In this case, the paired cranes may symbolise a wish for a happy marriage.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Paper painted with ink and mineral colours
Brief Description
Pap, Korea, paintings and drawings. Hanging scroll depicting a pine tree and a pair of cranes, Korea, 19th Century, ink and mineral colours on paper
Physical Description
This hanging scroll depicts a pine tree and a pair of cranes. It was made in Korea by an anonymous painter in the 19th century. The scroll is of paper and painted with ink and mineral colours.
Dimensions
  • Length: 146.05cm
  • Width: 55.88cm
Style
Credit line
Given by Kang Collection, Inc.
Subjects depicted
Summary
Two cranes and two young chicks stand beneath the sprawling branch of a pine tree in this Korean hanging scroll from the 19th century. The scroll is an example of Korean folk painting (minhwa) and demonstrates the kaleidoscope of colour and exuberance of form typical of the genre. Found in the formal settings of palaces as well as in the homes of aristocrats and commoners, folk paintings have a strong connection with the lives of ordinary people.



During the Choson period (1392–1910), folk paintings took as their subjects a wide range of motifs. The subject matter depended on the sex, age and social standing of the person in whose room the painting was to be displayed. Paintings of birds and flowers often decorated women’s quarters, whereas images of books and scholars’ utensils were appropriate for a scholar’s study. The pine-and-crane motif occurs frequently in East Asian art and is associated with longevity. In this case, the paired cranes may symbolise a wish for a happy marriage.
Collection
Accession Number
FE.4-2003

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record createdMarch 26, 2004
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