Not currently on display at the V&A

Heat Haze

Vase
1992 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Osumi's work is characterised by gracefully proportioned forms and generously flowing surface patterning executed in 'textile-imprint-inlay' (J: nunomezogan). This involves hammering metal leaf or wire into a fine, mesh-like grid incised into the surface of the metal ground. On this particular work she has used lead and gold in the rendering of an abstract pattern that swirls around the vase in the opposite direction to the spiral faceting. This gives stability to the overall composition while providing colour and a sense of energy and drama. After the inlaying had been completed, the vase was pickled black and then polished so that just enough of the patina remained to show off the intricate texture of the hammered surface. The bright, unpatinated bands bordering the areas of lead inlay are the natural outcome of the way in which the presence of lead prevented the blackening of the silver in the patinating bath.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Vase
  • Storage Box
Materials and Techniques
Hammered silver with nunomezogan (textile imprint inlay) decoration in lead and gold
Dimensions
  • Diameter: 14.8cm
  • Height: 31.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Yuki (Maker’s mark YUKI incised on base)
Object history
Colour and texture have been provided by Osumi's use of gold and lead inlay on the hammered silver surface. After the inlay work had been completed, the bottle was pickled black and then polished so that just enough of the patina remained to show the intricate texture of the hammered surface.
Summary
Osumi's work is characterised by gracefully proportioned forms and generously flowing surface patterning executed in 'textile-imprint-inlay' (J: nunomezogan). This involves hammering metal leaf or wire into a fine, mesh-like grid incised into the surface of the metal ground. On this particular work she has used lead and gold in the rendering of an abstract pattern that swirls around the vase in the opposite direction to the spiral faceting. This gives stability to the overall composition while providing colour and a sense of energy and drama. After the inlaying had been completed, the vase was pickled black and then polished so that just enough of the patina remained to show off the intricate texture of the hammered surface. The bright, unpatinated bands bordering the areas of lead inlay are the natural outcome of the way in which the presence of lead prevented the blackening of the silver in the patinating bath.
Bibliographic Reference
Rupert Faulkner. Japanese Studio Crafts: Tradition and the Avant-Garde. London, 1995.
Collection
Accession Number
FE.561:1,2-1992

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record createdMarch 11, 2004
Record URL