Teapot thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
China, Room 44, The T.T. Tsui Gallery

Teapot

1625-1655 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This teapot is an example of Yixing ware produced at the beginning of the Qing dynasty (1644-1910). The Yixing kilns, in the Jangsu province of eastern China, have been known since the 16th century for their teapots. The local clays in Yixing have a high sand content and can be cream, red or warm brown. The teapots are not usually glazed, but burnished and fired, and unlike the majority of Chinese crafts, they can be signed by the potters. This example has an incised mark reading: 'Made by Hui Mengchen in Jingqi' (an old name for Yixing).

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read Teapots through time Tea, the world's most consumed beverage after water, has a long and global history stretching across centuries and continents. Discover some of the finest examples of the most ubiquitous of all kitchen utensils: the teapot.

Object details

Categories
Object type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Teapot
  • Lid
Materials and techniques
Stoneware
Brief description
Teapot in Yixing ware, China, Qing dynasty, ca. 1650-60
Dimensions
  • Height: 8.3cm
Style
Marks and inscriptions
'Jing xi hui meng chen zhi' on base
Gallery label
Teapot Made by Hui Mengchen Ming-Qing dynasty 1625-1655 Yixing kilns, south China Unglazed brown stoneware Museum no. C.871-1936 From the Eumorfopoulos collection, purchased with the assistance of The Art Fund, the Vallentin Bequest, Sir Percival David and the Universities China Committee [Art Fund logo](2007)
Credit line
Purchased with Art Fund support, the Vallentin Bequest, Sir Percival David and the Universities China Committee
Summary
This teapot is an example of Yixing ware produced at the beginning of the Qing dynasty (1644-1910). The Yixing kilns, in the Jangsu province of eastern China, have been known since the 16th century for their teapots. The local clays in Yixing have a high sand content and can be cream, red or warm brown. The teapots are not usually glazed, but burnished and fired, and unlike the majority of Chinese crafts, they can be signed by the potters. This example has an incised mark reading: 'Made by Hui Mengchen in Jingqi' (an old name for Yixing).
Collection
Accession number
C.871&A-1936

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Record createdFebruary 27, 2004
Record URL
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