Table

ca. 1560 (made)
Table thumbnail 1
Table thumbnail 2
+2
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Islamic Middle East, Room 42, The Jameel Gallery
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This type of wooden table with a ceramic tile top held trays of food and drink. It would have used in an Ottoman palace, set before guests who sat on a low bench, or divan, built against the walls.

Many large polygonal tiles survive from the Ottoman period, but this example is one of the very few that still serves its original purpose as a table top. It was made in Iznik, north-west Anatolia, which was known as a centre of ceramic production.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Wood, inlaid with ebony and mother of pearl; with fritware ceramic top, painted under the glaze
Brief Description
Table made of wood faced with ebony, ivory and mother-of-pearl, the table top a twelve-sided Iznik tile, Turkey (Iznik and Istanbul), ca. 1560.
Physical Description
Body of the table: wood inlaid with ebony and mother of pearl; the top: fritware ceramic painted under the glaze. The tile has twelve sides, but the table is constructed with spandrel-like joins between the legs so that it stands on six legs.
Dimensions
  • Height: 48cm
  • Diameter: 63cm
Styles
Gallery Label
Jameel Gallery Tile-top Table Turkey, Iznik and Istanbul About 1560 In Ottoman palaces, guests sat on a low bench, or divan, built against the wall. Trays of food and drink were set before them, resting on tables of this type. Wood faced with ebony, with inlay of ivory and mother-of-pearl; fritware painted under the glaze Museum no. C.19-1987 (2006)
Summary
This type of wooden table with a ceramic tile top held trays of food and drink. It would have used in an Ottoman palace, set before guests who sat on a low bench, or divan, built against the walls.



Many large polygonal tiles survive from the Ottoman period, but this example is one of the very few that still serves its original purpose as a table top. It was made in Iznik, north-west Anatolia, which was known as a centre of ceramic production.
Bibliographic References
  • Tim Stanley (ed.), with Mariam Rosser-Owen and Stephen Vernoit, Palace and Mosque: Islamic Art from the Middle East, London, V&A Publications, 2004p.103
  • Baker, Malcolm, and Brenda Richardson (eds.), A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London: V&A Publications, 1999.
Collection
Accession Number
C.19-1987

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record createdSeptember 28, 1998
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