Not currently on display at the V&A

28 Positions in 34 years

Print
1992 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Born in Liverpool to Indian immigrant parents, Chila Kumari Burman joined the vanguard of young black and Asian artists who campaigned for greater visibility in the British art world during the 1980s and 1990s. This meant, 'among other things, self representation and artistic credibility' [Lynda Nead].

In this witty, colourful self portrait, Burman suggests the number of stereotypical interpretations she has been subject to and indeed expected to assume, but at the same time the image also reflects on her own way of working in which she has consistently used self image 'in an ever-expanding repertoire of provocative and active female identities' [Lynda Nead]. The use of laser print is particularly appropriate in a context where a multiple image and an aura of street credibility is required; a sense of rapid and cheap production is central to the ethos of her work.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Colour laser prints on paper
Brief Description
Print by Chila Kumari Burman entitled '28 Positions in 34 years'. Great Britain, 1992.
Physical Description
Large sheet of multiple self-portrait images each coloured differently with bright 'psychedelic' coloured inks.
Dimensions
  • Image height: 116.2cm
  • Image width: 159.3cm
  • Support height: 120.7cm
  • Support width: 170.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Chila (1) Signature; pencil; 1992)
Production
Attribution note: The image has been produced on a smaller scale, edition number not known.
Subjects depicted
Summary
Born in Liverpool to Indian immigrant parents, Chila Kumari Burman joined the vanguard of young black and Asian artists who campaigned for greater visibility in the British art world during the 1980s and 1990s. This meant, 'among other things, self representation and artistic credibility' [Lynda Nead].



In this witty, colourful self portrait, Burman suggests the number of stereotypical interpretations she has been subject to and indeed expected to assume, but at the same time the image also reflects on her own way of working in which she has consistently used self image 'in an ever-expanding repertoire of provocative and active female identities' [Lynda Nead]. The use of laser print is particularly appropriate in a context where a multiple image and an aura of street credibility is required; a sense of rapid and cheap production is central to the ethos of her work.
Bibliographic Reference
Lynda Nead Chila Kumari Burman Beyond Two Cultures. London, Kala Press, 1995. pp 43-52
Collection
Accession Number
E.2071-1997

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record createdDecember 31, 2003
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