Ring Tray thumbnail 1
Ring Tray thumbnail 2
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images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91 to 93 mezzanine, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Ring Tray

ca. 1901 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Eugene Feuillâtre (1870-1916), perhaps best known for his jewellery, was a distinguished Parisian enameller who frequently exhibited his work at the Paris Salon. Commenting on one of his early appearances at the Paris Salon in 1898, the periodical Art et Decoration noted that he was already working in the difficult techniques of plique-à-jour--a form of cloisonné in which the back or ground is affixed temporarily in the process of working and is removed after firing. It required considerable skill to deploy this technique, in relief, over such a large area as seen in this dish.

Here, the plique-à-jour enamel is mounted in silver in the form of three branches which rise from a foliated base. There is a silver edge to the enamel, which represents an underwater scene with fishes.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Plique-à-jour enamel set in silver
Brief Description
Gilded silver with opals and plique-à-jour enamel dish with a Fish in the Sea design, made by Eugène Feuillâtre, France,1902.
Physical Description
Tray of plique-à-jour enamel mounted in gilded silver in the form of three branches which rise from an irregular foliated base. The predominant colours are green, blue and brown in a variety of tones, with touches of gold and red. The enamel is mounted with opals.
Dimensions
  • Height: 11cm
  • Diameter: 29cm
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
Stamped FEUILLATRE three times (On the underside of the base)
Credit line
Given in memory of Lavinia and Charles Handley-Read by Mr. Thomas Stainton.
Object history
Exhibited at the Turin Exhibition, 1902.
Subject depicted
Summary
Eugene Feuillâtre (1870-1916), perhaps best known for his jewellery, was a distinguished Parisian enameller who frequently exhibited his work at the Paris Salon. Commenting on one of his early appearances at the Paris Salon in 1898, the periodical Art et Decoration noted that he was already working in the difficult techniques of plique-à-jour--a form of cloisonné in which the back or ground is affixed temporarily in the process of working and is removed after firing. It required considerable skill to deploy this technique, in relief, over such a large area as seen in this dish.



Here, the plique-à-jour enamel is mounted in silver in the form of three branches which rise from a foliated base. There is a silver edge to the enamel, which represents an underwater scene with fishes.
Bibliographic References
  • Greenhalgh, Paul (Ed.), Art Nouveau: 1890-1914 . London: V&A Publications, 2000
  • Jervis, Simon, Victorian and Edwardian decorative art: the Handley-Read collection, London, Royal Academy of Arts, 1972
Collection
Accession Number
M.24-1972

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record createdDecember 30, 2003
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