Kinkizan on Enoshima Island in Sagami Province thumbnail 1
Kinkizan on Enoshima Island in Sagami Province thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Kinkizan on Enoshima Island in Sagami Province

Woodblock Print
1855 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This print is an 'uchiwa-e' (rigid fan print) design by Hiroshige. It is one of a series of 'aizuri' or monochrome blue depictions of famous places in Sagami Province (Kanagawa Prefecture). This particular view shows the island of Enoshima. It is situated off the coast of Suruga Bay to the west of Kamakura, Japan's military capital from 1185 to 1333.

The gatelike structure across the water marks the beginning of the approach to the cluster of shrine buildings. You can just see them among the trees in the upper part of the island. The Kinkizan of the title is part of the Buddhist name of what was a combined Buddhist and Shinto establishment. The Meiji government forced separation of religious institutions in 1870.


Object details

Categories
Object type
TitleKinkizan on Enoshima Island in Sagami Province (assigned by artist)
Materials and techniques
Colour print from woodblocks
Brief description
Woodblock print, Utagawa Hiroshige I; 'Kinkizan on Enoshima Island in Sagami Province', from an untitled series of views of famous places in Sagami Province; fan print, Japanese, 1855
Physical description
Fan print, aiban size. Artist signature: Hiroshige ga. Publisher mark: Maruya Jinpachi. Censorship seal: aratame. Date seal: Hare 2 (1855/2).
Dimensions
  • Approx. height: 220mm
  • Approx. width: 290mm
Style
Object history
Purchased from S. M. Franck & Co., accessioned in 1886. This acquisition information reflects that found in the Asia Department registers, as part of a 2022 provenance research project.
Summary
This print is an 'uchiwa-e' (rigid fan print) design by Hiroshige. It is one of a series of 'aizuri' or monochrome blue depictions of famous places in Sagami Province (Kanagawa Prefecture). This particular view shows the island of Enoshima. It is situated off the coast of Suruga Bay to the west of Kamakura, Japan's military capital from 1185 to 1333.

The gatelike structure across the water marks the beginning of the approach to the cluster of shrine buildings. You can just see them among the trees in the upper part of the island. The Kinkizan of the title is part of the Buddhist name of what was a combined Buddhist and Shinto establishment. The Meiji government forced separation of religious institutions in 1870.
Collection
Accession number
E.12068-1886

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest feedback

Record createdNovember 27, 2003
Record URL
Download as: JSONIIIF Manifest