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Bodystocking

late 1960s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

Mary Quant’s first boutique, Bazaar, opened in London's King's Road in 1955, launching a successful fashion career. Her youthful easy-to-wear clothing became so popular that in 1963, she launched a lower-priced ready-to-wear range called 'Ginger Group'. She also entered into licensing agreements with manufacturers to produce hosiery, underwear, cosmetics and accessories bearing her name. Almost anyone, whatever their income, could spare the money to buy a pair of 'Mary Quant' stockings or a lipstick. This enabled girls who could not otherwise afford her clothing to feel in touch with fashion, and made Mary Quant a household name and a commercial success.

Her contribution to British life was marked by a retrospective exhibition at the London Museum in 1973. The exhibition included many of Quant's most revolutionary garments, some remade as facsimiles if original ones could not be found.
watch Shaping the body: from corsets to bullet-bras Eleri Lynn, author of the V&A book 'Underwear: Fashion in Detail', tells the story of shape-wear: from the steel and whalebone engineering of Victorian and Edwardian corsetry, to the breast-flattening bandeau bras worn by 1920s flappers, the bullet-bras of the 1950s, the arrival of Lycra i...
read Introducing Mary Quant Inventive, opinionated and commercially minded, Mary Quant was the most iconic fashion designer of the 1960s. A design and retail pioneer, she popularised super-high hemlines and other irreverent looks that were critical to the development of the 'Swinging Sixties' scene. Our fashion colle...
Object details
Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Synthetic jersey and nylon
Brief description
Bodystocking of synthetic jersey and nylon, designed by Mary Quant, Great Britain, late 1960s
Physical description
Body-stocking of cream synthetic jersey and sheer white nylon.
Dimensions
  • Waist circumference: 55cm (unstretched) (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Bust circumference: 77cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Nape waist length: 36cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
Gallery label
  • Designed by Quant Warner's introduced flesh coloured body stockings in America in 1964. Mary Quant's version, which combined an opaque body with transparent cups, gave a smooth, natural outline to the body while offering light support. Quant was one of the most influential British designers of the late 1950s and '60s and her distinctive daisy logo carried considerable cachet. Body stocking Mary Quant (b.1934) Britain, late 1960s Synthetic jersey and nylon V&A: T.443-1988 Given by Mrs M. Wilson-MacDonald(16/04/2016-12/03/2017)
  • Designer Mary Quant played an important part in the youth revolution of the 'Swinging Sixties', when fashion wsa focussed on androgynous adolescent figures, like that of model Twiggy, and teenagers looked with derision upon the tea-rose, steel busks and suspenders of the 1950s. When Quant championed the mini-skirt, she signalled a change in underwear styling towards tights and streamlined foundation garments that would not show under short skirts and tight tops. 'Youthlines' body stocking Mary Quant (born 1934) Britain (London), about 1965 Synthetic jersey with Lycra, with nylon marquisette Given by Mrs M. Wilson-MacDonald V&A: T.443-1988(2013-2015)
  • The sleek undergarment, which gave a smooth and natural outline to the body, was designed to apeal to modern tastes. Mary Quant's distinctive daisy logo carried considerable cachet.(1997)
Credit line
Given by Mrs M. Wilson-MacDonald
Summary
Mary Quant’s first boutique, Bazaar, opened in London's King's Road in 1955, launching a successful fashion career. Her youthful easy-to-wear clothing became so popular that in 1963, she launched a lower-priced ready-to-wear range called 'Ginger Group'. She also entered into licensing agreements with manufacturers to produce hosiery, underwear, cosmetics and accessories bearing her name. Almost anyone, whatever their income, could spare the money to buy a pair of 'Mary Quant' stockings or a lipstick. This enabled girls who could not otherwise afford her clothing to feel in touch with fashion, and made Mary Quant a household name and a commercial success.



Her contribution to British life was marked by a retrospective exhibition at the London Museum in 1973. The exhibition included many of Quant's most revolutionary garments, some remade as facsimiles if original ones could not be found.
Collection
Accession number
T.443-1988

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Record createdSeptember 25, 2003
Record URL
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