Kiss of Death

Bonnet
1994 (made)
Kiss of Death thumbnail 1
Kiss of Death thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Jo Gordon has taken the traditional structure of a poke bonnet to extremes. The long, menacing feathers project forward over two feet in a tunnel-like brim, which almost obscures the face. Gordon initially trained as a fine artist, studying sculpture at Grays School of Art in Aberdeen. She then undertook a two-year millinery course at the Royal College of Art. After 1995 Gordon branched out into knitwear, an area in which she continues to specialise and experiment.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Satin, pheasant feathers
Brief Description
'Kiss of Death', black satin bonnet with pheasant feathers, designed by Jo Gordon, Britain, 1994
Physical Description
Black satin bonnet with pheasant feathers
Dimensions
  • Height: 170mm
  • Width: 240mm
  • Depth: 700mm
  • Height: 395mm (Note: mounted)
  • Width: 305mm (Note: mounted)
  • Depth: 715mm (Note: mounted)
Production typeHaute couture
Gallery Label
Jo Gordon has taken the traditional structure of a poke bonnet to extremes. The long, menacing feathers project forward over two feet in a tunnel-like brim, which almost obscures the face.(1997)
Credit line
Given by the designer
Object history
Registered File number 1996/371.
Summary
Jo Gordon has taken the traditional structure of a poke bonnet to extremes. The long, menacing feathers project forward over two feet in a tunnel-like brim, which almost obscures the face. Gordon initially trained as a fine artist, studying sculpture at Grays School of Art in Aberdeen. She then undertook a two-year millinery course at the Royal College of Art. After 1995 Gordon branched out into knitwear, an area in which she continues to specialise and experiment.
Bibliographic Reference
De la Haye, Amy (ed.). The Cutting Edge: 50 Years of British Fashion 1947- 1997. London : V&A Publications, 1997plate 112
Collection
Accession Number
T.139-1996

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record createdSeptember 17, 2003
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