Vase and Cover thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 52, The George Levy Gallery

Vase and Cover


Object Type
This vase is purely a decorative one. Sets of three, five, seven or even nine vases were known as 'suites of vases' in the 18th and early 19th centuries. They were commonly set out on mantelpieces, with the largest one in the middle. This vase is unusually elongated.

Design & Designing
Both the colour range and the painted pattern itself were inspired by a type of Japanese porcelain known today as 'Kakiemon', after Sakaida Kakiemon (1596-1666), a Japanese porcelain maker whose decoration was widely copied in Europe in the 18th century. The bulk of the Kakiemon wares (which were made for export) that found their way to Britain were made before 1700. They were highly prized in mid-18th century Britain, when they were often described as 'Old Japan'. The Bow factory papers include several references to 'Japan' patterns or wares.

Materials & Making
The Bow factory made a type of porcelain that was strengthened with bone ash. It concentrated on the production of utilitarian wares, but also made a large number of figures and ornamental wares, including vases. The factory was very large, employing about 300 people around 1760 and calling in receipts of £11,555 in 1755.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Vase
  • Cover
Materials and Techniques
Soft-paste porcelain, painted in enamels and gilt
Brief Description
Soft-paste porcelain vase and cover, painted flowers and a dragon in a Japanese (Kakeimon) style. English (London), ca.1755, made by the Bow Factory.The cover is a later addition (English, 19th century).
Physical Description
Elongated egg-shaped vase with a domed cover. Painted in enamel colours, in Japanese (Kakiemon) style, with a dragon, branches of prunus and chysanthemum, with detatched floral sprays and pomegranates in red, blue, green and gold.
Dimensions
  • Height: 23.8cm
  • Diameter: 10.5cm
Styles
Gallery Label
British Galleries: Europeans greatly admired the Kakiemon porcelains of Japan. Faithful copies were made at Chelsea and Bow in London, and in Germany and France. They were often painted with asymmetric patterns of flowers, birds and dragons in a colour scheme dominated by orange-red.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Bequeathed by Lt. Col. G. B. Croft-Lyons FSA
Object history
Made at the Bow porcelain factory, London
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
This vase is purely a decorative one. Sets of three, five, seven or even nine vases were known as 'suites of vases' in the 18th and early 19th centuries. They were commonly set out on mantelpieces, with the largest one in the middle. This vase is unusually elongated.

Design & Designing
Both the colour range and the painted pattern itself were inspired by a type of Japanese porcelain known today as 'Kakiemon', after Sakaida Kakiemon (1596-1666), a Japanese porcelain maker whose decoration was widely copied in Europe in the 18th century. The bulk of the Kakiemon wares (which were made for export) that found their way to Britain were made before 1700. They were highly prized in mid-18th century Britain, when they were often described as 'Old Japan'. The Bow factory papers include several references to 'Japan' patterns or wares.

Materials & Making
The Bow factory made a type of porcelain that was strengthened with bone ash. It concentrated on the production of utilitarian wares, but also made a large number of figures and ornamental wares, including vases. The factory was very large, employing about 300 people around 1760 and calling in receipts of £11,555 in 1755.
Bibliographic References
  • [Honey, W.B. Old English Porcelain. London: Faber& Faber, 1948. p.93, plate 30A.]
  • [Honey, W.B. English Pottery and Porcelain. London: Black, 1947. p.139.]
Collection
Accession Number
C.333&A-1926

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record createdJune 23, 1998
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