BBB thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery

BBB

Tile
1898 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Hand-painted tiles became a regular feature of Arts and Crafts interiors from the 1860s onwards. Such schemes were often associated with the revival among architects of the English vernacular, and notably the 'Old English' and 'Queen Anne' styles pioneered by Richard Norman Shaw. The tiles themselves were produced by firms such as those of William Morris and William De Morgan, or were imported from The Netherlands. Larger industrial manufacturers also produced some lines that catered to Arts and Crafts tastes. Fireplaces were the most common setting for such tiles.

Design & Designing
This pattern, with flower heads facing in alternating directions, was probably the most popular of all of De Morgan's tile designs. It was known as 'BBB', after the Norwich firm of Barnard, Bishop and Barnard who made cast-iron fireplaces and supplied tiles for use in conjunction with them.

Materials & Making
De Morgan's technique for transferring patterns to tiles such as these was unusual. The decoration was painted onto a sheet of fine tissue placed on a sheet of glass, behind which an outline of the pattern acted as a guide. The tissue was then fixed face-down onto the surface of the tile, which had been coated with a layer of fine white clay. The surface was then dusted with powdered glaze. During the firing the tissue would burn away and the ash would be incorporated into the glaze.
read William De Morgan – an introduction With their vibrant colours and captivating designs, the ceramics of William De Morgan (1839 – 1917) are among the most attractive, recognisable, and enduringly popular decorative arts of the late Victorian period.
object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Earthenware, with hand-painted decoration over a white slip
Brief Description
Tile
Physical Description
Pair of tiles: 'BBB'
Dimensions
  • Height: 15.1cm
  • Width: 15.1cm
  • Depth: 1cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Impressed mark: 'DM98'
Gallery Label
British Galleries: ORIGINAL DESIGN FOR TILES and two examples
The potter William De Morgan made both grand, individual works of art, such as the vase and cover in the case above, and more commercial items such as tiles. Here is the original design and two samples of a pattern called BBB. This was one of his most popular tiles and was named after the iron founding firm of Barnard, Bishop and Barnard of Norwich, who made the fireplaces in which De Morgan's tiles were frequently used.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Bequeathed by Mrs G. M. Spear
Object history
Designed by William De Morgan (born in London, 1839, died there in 1917) and made by his firm in Fulham, London
Summary
Object Type
Hand-painted tiles became a regular feature of Arts and Crafts interiors from the 1860s onwards. Such schemes were often associated with the revival among architects of the English vernacular, and notably the 'Old English' and 'Queen Anne' styles pioneered by Richard Norman Shaw. The tiles themselves were produced by firms such as those of William Morris and William De Morgan, or were imported from The Netherlands. Larger industrial manufacturers also produced some lines that catered to Arts and Crafts tastes. Fireplaces were the most common setting for such tiles.

Design & Designing
This pattern, with flower heads facing in alternating directions, was probably the most popular of all of De Morgan's tile designs. It was known as 'BBB', after the Norwich firm of Barnard, Bishop and Barnard who made cast-iron fireplaces and supplied tiles for use in conjunction with them.

Materials & Making
De Morgan's technique for transferring patterns to tiles such as these was unusual. The decoration was painted onto a sheet of fine tissue placed on a sheet of glass, behind which an outline of the pattern acted as a guide. The tissue was then fixed face-down onto the surface of the tile, which had been coated with a layer of fine white clay. The surface was then dusted with powdered glaze. During the firing the tissue would burn away and the ash would be incorporated into the glaze.
Collection
Accession Number
C.12B-1971

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record createdMay 8, 2003
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