Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 122

Bracket

ca. 1853 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Brackets were used for displaying prized possessions, such as bronzes, marble busts or porcelain vases. They were often carved with architectural motifs, such as scrolls, or with more decorative designs, such as the strapwork, swags and dolphins on this bracket.

People
William Gibbs Rogers (1792-1875) was one of the prominent figures in the revival of woodcarving in the1840s and 1850s. He was highly skilled, capable of working in a range of styles including Gothic, the style of the 17th-century carver Grinling Gibbons, and of French designs of the 1740s. His son William Harry Rogers (1825-1873) was chief designer for his father and specialised in Renaissance-style designs, many of which were illustrated in contemporary periodicals such as 'The Art Union', 'The Art Journal', and 'The Builder'. This bracket is carved with his monogram.

Time
W.G. Rogers exhibited a large group of woodcarvings at the Great Industrial Exhibition of 1853 in Dublin. Many of his exhibits were examples of fashionable styles of the 1850s. They included a portrait frame carved with scrolls, flowers and trophies in the style of Louis XV, priced at £21, a boxwood salad spoon and fork with stems of celery forming the handles (price £5), and this bracket, priced at £21.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Carved boxwood
Brief Description
Bracket, wood, designed by William Harry Rogers, carved by William Gibbs Rogers, London, ca.1853
Physical Description
Carved wooden bracket, decoration incorporates the mask of a satyr, strapwork, swags, dolphins and a floral frieze.
Dimensions
  • Height: 26cm
  • Width: 15.4cm
  • Depth: 11.5cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 21/06/1999 by LH
Gallery Label
British Galleries: William Gibbs Rogers, who carved this bracket, was one of the most famous woodcarvers of his day.The design incorporates typical Renaissance-style motifs such as the mask of a satyr (half human, half goat), strapwork, swags, dolphins and a floral frieze.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Designed in Soho, London by William Harry Rogers (born in London, 1825, died there in 1873) and carved by his father William Gibbs Rogers (born in Dover, Kent, 1792, died London, 1875).



From the collection of Charles and Lavinia Handley-Read and purchased from her brother, Thomas Stainton.
Summary
Object Type
Brackets were used for displaying prized possessions, such as bronzes, marble busts or porcelain vases. They were often carved with architectural motifs, such as scrolls, or with more decorative designs, such as the strapwork, swags and dolphins on this bracket.

People
William Gibbs Rogers (1792-1875) was one of the prominent figures in the revival of woodcarving in the1840s and 1850s. He was highly skilled, capable of working in a range of styles including Gothic, the style of the 17th-century carver Grinling Gibbons, and of French designs of the 1740s. His son William Harry Rogers (1825-1873) was chief designer for his father and specialised in Renaissance-style designs, many of which were illustrated in contemporary periodicals such as 'The Art Union', 'The Art Journal', and 'The Builder'. This bracket is carved with his monogram.

Time
W.G. Rogers exhibited a large group of woodcarvings at the Great Industrial Exhibition of 1853 in Dublin. Many of his exhibits were examples of fashionable styles of the 1850s. They included a portrait frame carved with scrolls, flowers and trophies in the style of Louis XV, priced at £21, a boxwood salad spoon and fork with stems of celery forming the handles (price £5), and this bracket, priced at £21.
Bibliographic References
  • ‘Charles and Lavinia Handley-Read at Home’ by Charlotte Gere, in ‘The Charles and Lavinia Handley-Read Collection’, Decorative Arts Society Journal no. 40 (2016). p.16, illus. plate 6.
  • Jervis, Simon, Victorian and Edwardian decorative art: the Handley-Read collection, London, Royal Academy of Arts, 1972
Collection
Accession Number
W.28-1972

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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