Pin Cushion thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 54a

Pin Cushion

1650-1699 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This pin cushion characterises the style of embroidery of the 1660s and 1670s. The preference is for mainly metal threads worked over thick padding, giving a heavy three-dimensional effect. The embroidery design is quite architectural, incorporating stylised floral patterns.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Satin, embroidered with silver and silver-gilt thread, cord and purl
Brief Description
Pin cushion of embroidered satin, England, 1650-1699
Physical Description
Small, rectangular pin cushion of deep purple satin embroidered with silver gilt and silver thread with metal cord and purl inlaid work with some padding. It is also embroidered with some coloured silks in satin stitch.



The edges are bound with a silver gilt braid and at each corner are tassels of purple ribbon and silver gilt and silver thread attached to wooden balls wrapped in silver thread.



Both sides of the pin cushion have closely packed floral borders and a crowned monogram. On one side a more simple monogram is enclosed by a wreath and on the other side an elaborate monogram is flanked by feathers.
Dimensions
  • Width: 7.9cm
  • Length: 10.2cm
  • Depth: 3.7cm
  • Width: 3.125in
  • Length: 4in
  • Depth: 1.5in
Marks and Inscriptions
'A.E.' (Crowned monogram)
Gallery Label
British Galleries: PURSE AND PINCUSHIONS
By 1680 women used fewer pins when getting dressed. These pin cushions are much smaller than those used around 1600. The dense, metal thread embroidery also leaves little room for pins. Some contemporary writers mocked the variety of luxury trinkets to be found in a lady's dressing room.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Peter Barker-Mill
Object history
Made in England
Summary
Object Type
This pin cushion characterises the style of embroidery of the 1660s and 1670s. The preference is for mainly metal threads worked over thick padding, giving a heavy three-dimensional effect. The embroidery design is quite architectural, incorporating stylised floral patterns.
Collection
Accession Number
T.55-1978

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
Record URL