Pair of Gloves thumbnail 1
Pair of Gloves thumbnail 2
+3
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 58b

This object consists of 2 parts, some of which may be located elsewhere.

Pair of Gloves

1590-1610 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Gloves in the 16th and early 17th centuries were much more than just an accessory to fashionable dress. The wearing or carrying of gloves by either sex was a conspicuous mark of rank and ostentation. They were worn in the hat or belt, as well as carried in the hand. Gloves were popular as gifts and were often given by a young gallant to his favourite mistress. In combat, a glove was thrown down as a gage, or challenge.

Subjects Depicted
The range of motifs on the glove, particularly the types of flowers, mixed with strawberries and birds, gives a good indication of the burgeoning interest in gardens and other natural subjects at the period.

Materials & Making
Gloves required a fine and supple leather. Doeskin and kid were the main types used. Although embroidery was the principal form of decoration for accessories, tapestry was also used. Small tapestry- woven articles, including gloves, were made by professional workshops for direct sale to the public in London shops.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Glove
  • Glove
Materials and Techniques
Leather, tapestry-woven in silk and gold threads, metal bobbin lace, spangles
Brief Description
Pair of leather gloves tapestry-woven in silks and metal threads, metal bobbin lace, probably made in Sheldon Tapestry Workshops, probably in Warwickshire, 1590-1610
Physical Description
Pair of gloves of white leather with gauntlet tapestry woven in silk and gold on woollen warps. 33 warp threads per in (13 per cm). With a pattern of trees, floral sprigs, strawberries with peacocks, parrots, owl and other birds. Trimmed with metal bobbin lace, vandyked and with spangles. The thumb and fork between 2nd and 3rd fingers of the left glove, A, are missing.
Dimensions
  • T.145 1931 length: 35cm
  • T.145 1931 width: 20cm
  • T.145 a 1931 length: 34.5cm (approx)
  • T.145 a 1931 width: 20.2cm (approx)
Gallery Label
British Galleries: SMALL TAPESTRY ITEMS
In the early 17th century, small tapestry articles such as book covers, pin cushions, sweet bags and gloves could be bought from London shops. Such items were luxuries since the silk and gold thread was so expensive. These three pieces are decorated with popular motifs of the time, including fruit, flowers and animals. The Bible cover also has scenes of Moses on the front and Jonah and the Whale on the back.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Possibly made at the Sheldon tapestry workshops at Bordersley, Worcestershire or Barcheston, Warwickshire
Summary
Object Type

Gloves in the 16th and early 17th centuries were much more than just an accessory to fashionable dress. The wearing or carrying of gloves by either sex was a conspicuous mark of rank and ostentation. They were worn in the hat or belt, as well as carried in the hand. Gloves were popular as gifts and were often given by a young gallant to his favourite mistress. In combat, a glove was thrown down as a gage, or challenge.



Subjects Depicted

The range of motifs on the glove, particularly the types of flowers, mixed with strawberries and birds, gives a good indication of the burgeoning interest in gardens and other natural subjects at the period.



Materials & Making

Gloves required a fine and supple leather. Doeskin and kid were the main types used. Although embroidery was the principal form of decoration for accessories, tapestry was also used. Small tapestry- woven articles, including gloves, were made by professional workshops for direct sale to the public in London shops.
Collection
Accession Number
T.145&A-1931

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdMarch 27, 2003
Record URL