Teapot

1778-1779 (hallmarked)
Teapot thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 118; The Wolfson Gallery
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
The teapot form which evolved in Europe began as an imitation of the Chinese wine pot. Although the first silver teapots date from the late 17th century, by the time this teapot was made in the 1770s, the object was a familiar one in many households. A wide choice of material, including cheaper ceramics and glass as well as inexpensive metal products such as Sheffield plate and tinned copper, expanded the market for tea wares. A silver teapot was the most expensive of the available products. In 1740, for example, a Mrs Code ordered a tea service for £58 10s 6d from the goldsmith George Wickes, including a teapot for £6 5s.

People
This teapot was made by the Swedish-born silversmith Andrew Fogelberg (born about 1732; died about 1815), who was established in London by the 1770s. His Church Street workshop was near that of the gem engraver and modeller James Tassie (1735-1799), and it is probable that he relied directly on Tassie's glass paste reproductions of classical gemstones for his models.

Design & Manufacture
Working either alone or in partnership with Stephen Gilbert, Fogelberg made silver which can be distinguished by its high quality of workmanship and an elegant, restrained classicism. This teapot demonstrates the style through the uncluttered straight-sided form and minimalist decoration of beaded borders and medallions surrounded by an area of plain silver.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Silver, with cast and stamped decoration; the holly wood handle is a replacement
Dimensions
  • Height: 12.75cm
  • Width: 26.5cm
  • Depth: 11cm
Marks and Inscriptions
  • Andrew Fogelberg
  • Stamped
  • Town mark: London
Gallery Label
British Galleries: Teapots of oval shape with straight sides were an innovative Neo-classical form. This example is decorated only with borders of beading and medallions, taken from casts in glass paste of ancient cameos.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Bequeathed by Mrs M.V. Cunliffe
Object history
Made in London by Andrew Fogelberg (possibly born in Sweden, active in London from 1773 to around 1800); medallions based on cameos by James Tassie (born in 1735, died in 1799)
Summary
Object Type
The teapot form which evolved in Europe began as an imitation of the Chinese wine pot. Although the first silver teapots date from the late 17th century, by the time this teapot was made in the 1770s, the object was a familiar one in many households. A wide choice of material, including cheaper ceramics and glass as well as inexpensive metal products such as Sheffield plate and tinned copper, expanded the market for tea wares. A silver teapot was the most expensive of the available products. In 1740, for example, a Mrs Code ordered a tea service for £58 10s 6d from the goldsmith George Wickes, including a teapot for £6 5s.

People
This teapot was made by the Swedish-born silversmith Andrew Fogelberg (born about 1732; died about 1815), who was established in London by the 1770s. His Church Street workshop was near that of the gem engraver and modeller James Tassie (1735-1799), and it is probable that he relied directly on Tassie's glass paste reproductions of classical gemstones for his models.

Design & Manufacture
Working either alone or in partnership with Stephen Gilbert, Fogelberg made silver which can be distinguished by its high quality of workmanship and an elegant, restrained classicism. This teapot demonstrates the style through the uncluttered straight-sided form and minimalist decoration of beaded borders and medallions surrounded by an area of plain silver.
Collection
Accession Number
M.13-1963

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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