Chalice thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 122

This object consists of 2 parts, some of which may be located elsewhere.

Chalice

1868-1869 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

Object Type
A chalice is a cup used to contain wine at the most important act of worship of the Christian Church, the Holy Communion or Mass. The medieval form of a wide shallow cup on a short stem with a spreading foot was the usual style of the 19th-century chalice.

People
The Reverend Wagner, who ordered this chalice, promoted the revival of Medieval Church ritual which was highly controversial in the Anglican Church. His outspoken views brought him into conflict with church authorities. St. Paul's church, Brighton, where Reverend Wagner was priest in charge, was built under the patronage of his father. It was here that the chalice was used. It was designed by the architect G.E. Street (1824-1881) and made in Birmingham by John Hardman and Company.

Trading
The chalice was not designed exclusively for St. Paul's church, Brighton and the design was offered to other clients of the manufacturers, John Hardman and Company. A chalice made by the firm for All Saints church, Bristol in 1868 is identical in appearance. The architect G.E. Street modified the design later for another silversmith, Barkentin and Krall. Frank Theodore, whilst apprenticed to Barkentin and Krall, made a copy of G.E. Street's drawing and presented it to the V&A Museum.

Object details

Object type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Chalice
  • Paten
Materials and techniques
Silver, with niello decoration
Brief description
Chalice, silver with niello decoration, Birmingham, 1868-1869, made by John Hardman and Co., designed by G.E. Street.
Dimensions
  • Height: 25cm
  • Diameter: 17cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 26/01/1999 by sf
Style
Production typeUnique
Marks and inscriptions
The translated inscription reads 'I will take this chalice of salvation and will call upon the name of the Lord'
Gallery label
British Galleries: The Anglican priest, Father Arthur Wagner, commissioned this chalice from the influential architect, George Edmund Street. Many churches benefited from the patronage of clergy and lay people who keenly supported the revival of Medieval ritual. They were generous in their expenditure to provide richly ornamented furnishings for church ceremonies.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Saint Paul's Church, Brighton
Object history
Designed by George Edmund Street (born in Woodford, Essex,1824, died in London,1881); made by John Hardman & Co., Birmingham
Summary
Object Type
A chalice is a cup used to contain wine at the most important act of worship of the Christian Church, the Holy Communion or Mass. The medieval form of a wide shallow cup on a short stem with a spreading foot was the usual style of the 19th-century chalice.

People
The Reverend Wagner, who ordered this chalice, promoted the revival of Medieval Church ritual which was highly controversial in the Anglican Church. His outspoken views brought him into conflict with church authorities. St. Paul's church, Brighton, where Reverend Wagner was priest in charge, was built under the patronage of his father. It was here that the chalice was used. It was designed by the architect G.E. Street (1824-1881) and made in Birmingham by John Hardman and Company.

Trading
The chalice was not designed exclusively for St. Paul's church, Brighton and the design was offered to other clients of the manufacturers, John Hardman and Company. A chalice made by the firm for All Saints church, Bristol in 1868 is identical in appearance. The architect G.E. Street modified the design later for another silversmith, Barkentin and Krall. Frank Theodore, whilst apprenticed to Barkentin and Krall, made a copy of G.E. Street's drawing and presented it to the V&A Museum.
Collection
Accession number
LOAN:BRIGHTON.2

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Record createdMarch 27, 2003
Record URL
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