Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 56, The Djanogly Gallery

Conversion of St. Paul

Engraving
1650-70 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This is a print of a type known as an engraving. The image is made by cutting lines into the surface of a flat piece of metal, inking the plate and then transferring the ink held in the lines onto a sheet of paper.

Source
The print is entitled The Conversion of Saint Paul. It is a copy of another engraving based on a painting by the Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens. The original oil painting dates from around 1621, and the V&A print was made sometime between then and 1657, when the publisher, Pierre Mariette, died.

The painting was in Berlin but was destroyed during the Second World War. An oil sketch of the same subject but with some differences in the composition, is in the collection of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford.

Subject Depicted
This print depicts a dramatic event in the life of the apostle Paul described the Bible (Acts 9:1-9). Paul was Jewish by race but inherited Roman citizenship from his father. He was riding to Damascus to obtain authorisation from the synagogue to arrest Christians when he was blinded by a light from heaven, which also caused him to fall to the ground. He and his companions heard the voice of God asking him why he was persecuting Christians. Paul was later baptised as a Christian, and together with Peter, was seen as one of the joint founders of the Christian Church.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
engraving print on paper
Brief Description
Conversion of St. Paul; From the picture by Rubens in the Pinakothek at Munich; A copy of the print by Schelte Bolswert, see DYCE.2265; Engraving print on paper; By François Ragot; Published by Pierre Mariette (I); Paris; 1650-70.
Physical Description
Conversion of St. Paul; From the picture by Rubens in the Pinakothek at Munich; A copy of the print by Schelte Bolswert, see DYCE.2265; Engraving print on paper; Signed 'Ragot fecit cum Priuilegio Regis'.
Dimensions
  • Height: 45.6cm
  • Width: 60.2cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'Ragot fecit cum Priuilegio Regis' (Signed.)
Gallery Label
British Galleries: THE CONVERSION OF SAINT PAUL: an embroidery and its printed source
Before the embroiderer of this panel (top) began work, the design was drawn onto the silk by a specialist, professional pattern drawer. He took his design directly from the print but modified it. He raised the horizon, adding buildings and plants, and changed the positions of the figures in relation to one another. The embroiderer further adapted the print by choosing the colours to be used.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Bequeathed by Rev. Alexander Dyce
Object history
By François Ragot (died in Paris, 1670) after a painting by Peter Paul Rubens (born in Siegen, Westphalia, Germany), 1577, died in Antwerp, Belgium, 1640); published in Paris by Pierre Mariette I (born in Paris, 1596, died there in 1657)
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
This is a print of a type known as an engraving. The image is made by cutting lines into the surface of a flat piece of metal, inking the plate and then transferring the ink held in the lines onto a sheet of paper.

Source
The print is entitled The Conversion of Saint Paul. It is a copy of another engraving based on a painting by the Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens. The original oil painting dates from around 1621, and the V&A print was made sometime between then and 1657, when the publisher, Pierre Mariette, died.

The painting was in Berlin but was destroyed during the Second World War. An oil sketch of the same subject but with some differences in the composition, is in the collection of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford.

Subject Depicted
This print depicts a dramatic event in the life of the apostle Paul described the Bible (Acts 9:1-9). Paul was Jewish by race but inherited Roman citizenship from his father. He was riding to Damascus to obtain authorisation from the synagogue to arrest Christians when he was blinded by a light from heaven, which also caused him to fall to the ground. He and his companions heard the voice of God asking him why he was persecuting Christians. Paul was later baptised as a Christian, and together with Peter, was seen as one of the joint founders of the Christian Church.
Associated Object
DYCE.2265 (Source)
Bibliographic Reference
DYCE COLLECTION. A Catalogue of the Paintings, Miniatures, Drawings, Engravings, Rings and Miscellaneous Objects Bequeathed by The Reverend Alexander Dyce. London : South Kensington Museum : Printed by G.E. Eyre and W. Spottiswoode for H.M.S.O., 1874.
Other Number
7 - Nagler. <u>Neues allgemeines Künstler-Lexicon</u>. München, 1835-1852.
Collection
Accession Number
DYCE.2457

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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