Not currently on display at the V&A

Clock

ca. 1905 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Archibald Knox (1864-1933) designed a number of clocks for the London retailer Liberty & Co. from 1902 onwards. The style of his clock designs for the 'Tudric' range in pewter were similar to those in silver. Enamel details on copper plaques were, however, more commonly associated with pewter pieces.

Design & Designing
The designs for the 'Tudric' range, as with Liberty's 'Cymric' range of silver and jewellery, were supplied by the Silver Studio. The Studio had offices in Brook Green, Hammersmith, London. Attributing individual designs of Liberty's wares to particular designers was hampered by Liberty's policy of concealing their identities. Nonetheless, subsequent research has identified the principal contributors. From the Silver Studio they included Rex Silver (1879-1965), the head of the Studio after 1896, his brother Harry Silver (1882-1972), Harry Napper (1860-1930) and John Illingworth Kay. The most prominent, however, was Archibald Knox, a gifted designer from the Isle of Man who started working for the Studio in 1898.

Manufacturer
W.H. Haseler of Birmingham, a firm of manufacturing goldsmiths and jewellers, manufactured the 'Tudric' range. The firm had formed a partnership with Liberty's in May 1901 to manufacture the 'Cymric' range of silver and jewellery, which Liberty had launched in 1899.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Clock
  • Key
Materials and Techniques
Pewter, with enamel decoration
Brief Description
Pewter and enamel, "Tudric range, Honesty design" Birmingham ca.1905, made by W.H. Haseler, designed by Archibald Knox.
Dimensions
  • Height: 33cm
  • Width: 16.6cm
  • Depth: 8cm
Dimensions checked: measured; 11/01/1999 by sf
Marks and Inscriptions
Stamped on the base: 'Tudric' over '0150'
Gallery Label
British Galleries: TUDRIC' WARE from Liberty &Co.
Tudric' pewter was one of Liberty & Co.'s most popular ranges. The hand-beaten appearance was popular with customers seeking to furnish their homes in the Arts and Crafts style. The designs were, in fact, stamped out mechanically and the pieces were then finished by hand.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Mr Martin Battersby
Object history
Designed by Archibald Knox (born in Cronkbourne, Tromode, Isle of Man, 1864, died in Douglas, Isle of Man, 1933) and made by W.H. Haseler in Birmingham, England for Liberty & Co., London
Summary
Object Type
Archibald Knox (1864-1933) designed a number of clocks for the London retailer Liberty & Co. from 1902 onwards. The style of his clock designs for the 'Tudric' range in pewter were similar to those in silver. Enamel details on copper plaques were, however, more commonly associated with pewter pieces.

Design & Designing
The designs for the 'Tudric' range, as with Liberty's 'Cymric' range of silver and jewellery, were supplied by the Silver Studio. The Studio had offices in Brook Green, Hammersmith, London. Attributing individual designs of Liberty's wares to particular designers was hampered by Liberty's policy of concealing their identities. Nonetheless, subsequent research has identified the principal contributors. From the Silver Studio they included Rex Silver (1879-1965), the head of the Studio after 1896, his brother Harry Silver (1882-1972), Harry Napper (1860-1930) and John Illingworth Kay. The most prominent, however, was Archibald Knox, a gifted designer from the Isle of Man who started working for the Studio in 1898.

Manufacturer
W.H. Haseler of Birmingham, a firm of manufacturing goldsmiths and jewellers, manufactured the 'Tudric' range. The firm had formed a partnership with Liberty's in May 1901 to manufacture the 'Cymric' range of silver and jewellery, which Liberty had launched in 1899.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.913&A-1967

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdMarch 27, 2003
Record URL