Claret Jug thumbnail 1
Claret Jug thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A Dundee
Scottish Design Galleries, V&A Dundee

Claret Jug

1879-1880 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This decanter epitomises Christopher Dresser's tendency to highlight the abstract qualities of oriental design. The broad base of the bottle is loosely based on the form of an Islamic or Chinese vase and the handle is derived from a Japanese precedent.

Design & Designing
Besides imitating handles found on Japanese objects, the form of the handle is easily recognisable in the profile of traditional roofs and temple gates in Japan. The engraved monogram on the lid, HS, also imitates a Japanese style.

People
Christopher Dresser is often regarded as the 'father of industrial design'. He designed utilitarian objects for the general public while making full use of the latest techniques of mass production. He trained at the Government School of Design and was significantly influenced by two of his tutors in particular, Richard Redgrave and Owen Jones. He was receptive to a wide range of influences, but above all he drew inspiration from botanical sources and Japanese art, both of which he studied intensively.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Glass, with silver mounts
Brief Description
Glass with silver mounts, London hallmarks for 1879-80, mark of Stephen Smith, designed by Christopher Dresser
Physical Description
Glass claret jug with silver mounts designed by Christopher Dresser (1834-1904). The jug a tall glass cylinder with a spreading base, surmounted by a plain collar of siver sheet, triangular spout, the lid a hinged disc, the vertical handle a strip of silver attached to the collar and a silver band around the body by two plain strips. There is an engraved monogram on the lid H.S in the Japanese style. The base is cut with a star.
Dimensions
  • Height: 22.5cm
  • Width: 14.7cm
  • Depth: 14cm
Dimensions checked: measured; 10/12/1998 by sf maximum dimensions including handle
Marks and Inscriptions
  • Maker's mark: S.S; engraved monograms on the lid, H.S. in the Japanese style
  • London hallmarks for 1878-9
Gallery Label
British Galleries: Dresser was impressed by what he called the 'simplicity of execution and boldness of design' of Japanese metalwork. This is reflected in his own work. The handle on this decanter is derived from those on Japanese water containers. The engraved monogram on the lid looks like a Japanese crest.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Designed by Christopher Dresser (born in Glasgow, 1834, died in Mulhouse, France, 1904); made in London by Stephen Smith & Sons



Design Cities Exhibition RF.2007/755
Production
Hallmarked for 1879 (neck band) and 1880 (lid)
Subject depicted
Summary
Object Type
This decanter epitomises Christopher Dresser's tendency to highlight the abstract qualities of oriental design. The broad base of the bottle is loosely based on the form of an Islamic or Chinese vase and the handle is derived from a Japanese precedent.

Design & Designing
Besides imitating handles found on Japanese objects, the form of the handle is easily recognisable in the profile of traditional roofs and temple gates in Japan. The engraved monogram on the lid, HS, also imitates a Japanese style.

People
Christopher Dresser is often regarded as the 'father of industrial design'. He designed utilitarian objects for the general public while making full use of the latest techniques of mass production. He trained at the Government School of Design and was significantly influenced by two of his tutors in particular, Richard Redgrave and Owen Jones. He was receptive to a wide range of influences, but above all he drew inspiration from botanical sources and Japanese art, both of which he studied intensively.
Bibliographic Reference
Celant, Germano, ed. Arts & Foods: Rituals since 1851. Catalogue of the exhibition at Expo, Milan, 9 April - 1 November 2015. Milan: Mondadori Electa, 2015.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.416-1967

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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