Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery

Punch Bowl

ca. 1900 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This substantial bowl was described on its acquisition as a punch bowl but it was certainly never used as such. Its generous proportions and the subject matter of the design are taken from the celebrated Hispano-Moresque ship bowls of 14th-century Malaga. these ship bowls are among the most prized of ceramics of collectors and museums. De Morgan's ceramics were also lovingly collected by admirers and this bowl would have been a prized possession.

People
William De Morgan (1839-1917) was a close friend of William Morris (1834-1896)and the two collected ceramics, textiles and other art works from Persia (modern-day Iran), Turkey and China, all of which influenced their own designs. The Reverend Stopford Brooke was clearly an admirer of De Morgan's work. His daughter, who presented this bowl in his memory, invited the Museum's Bernard Rackham, Keeper of Ceramics, to choose from 'many of the most beautiful pieces' in her father's collection. It was painted by Frederick Passenger who, with his brother Charles, was De Morgan's most talented decorator.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Earthenware, painted
Brief Description
Bowl, earthenware, decorated with the image of a ship, painted in colours, designed by William Frend De Morgan, made at the De Morgan Pottery, Merton Abbey, painted by Fred Passenger, England, ca. 1885
Physical Description
Bowl, earthenware, painted in colours, 46 cm diam., 15.5 cm deep. Marks: "F.P." painted in black. This substantial bowl, painted in deep turquoise blues and purples, is an example of De Morgan's "Persian" wares. Described as a punch bowl, in both its generous proportions and the subject of the decoration-fantastic ships were one of his favourite subjects-it refers most closely to the celebrated Hispano-Moresque "ship bowls" of Malaga.
Dimensions
  • Height: 15.5cm
  • Diameter: 46cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'F.P.' (Maker's identification; on the base; painted; paint)
Gallery Label
  • British Galleries: This bowl was designed by De Morgan whose inspiration were the 14th-century Moorish (Islamic) 'ship bowls' made in Malaga in southern Spain. Fred Passenger, the painter of this piece, was responsible for the decoration of a wide range of De Morgan's pottery displayed at Arts and Crafts exhibitions between 1888 and 1899.(27/03/2003)
  • Bowl Fred Passenger, William de Morgan, England, C.78-1923 Given by Miss Evelyn Brooke in memory of her father, the Rev.S.Brooke(23/05/2008)
Credit line
Given by Miss Evelyn Brooke, in memory of her father, the Rev. Stopford Brooke
Object history
Designed by William De Morgan (born in London, 1839, died there in 1917); made at the De Morgan pottery, Sands End, Fulham, London; painted by Frederick Passenger (probably working 1898-1907)
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
This substantial bowl was described on its acquisition as a punch bowl but it was certainly never used as such. Its generous proportions and the subject matter of the design are taken from the celebrated Hispano-Moresque ship bowls of 14th-century Malaga. these ship bowls are among the most prized of ceramics of collectors and museums. De Morgan's ceramics were also lovingly collected by admirers and this bowl would have been a prized possession.

People
William De Morgan (1839-1917) was a close friend of William Morris (1834-1896)and the two collected ceramics, textiles and other art works from Persia (modern-day Iran), Turkey and China, all of which influenced their own designs. The Reverend Stopford Brooke was clearly an admirer of De Morgan's work. His daughter, who presented this bowl in his memory, invited the Museum's Bernard Rackham, Keeper of Ceramics, to choose from 'many of the most beautiful pieces' in her father's collection. It was painted by Frederick Passenger who, with his brother Charles, was De Morgan's most talented decorator.
Bibliographic Reference
Baker, Malcolm, and Brenda Richardson (eds.), A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London: V&A Publications, 1999.
Collection
Accession Number
C.78-1923

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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