Teapot thumbnail 1
Teapot thumbnail 2
+2
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 123

Teapot

1896 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
Teapots seemed always to offer scope for the designer's imagination. Some examples used camels, monkeys or people as figures of fun, completely abandoning any relevance and entering the realms of novelty and sometimes of impracticability. This teapot borders on the whimsical and would certainly have provided a topic for conversation at teatime.

Materials & Making
The complex shape added considerably to the difficulties of making and applying the pattern. It was slip-cast in a convoluted mould but the material is earthenware (the cheapest to fire) and the decoration is transfer-printed.

Design & Designing
This highly elaborate teapot shows an Indian scene, with an elephant, British and Indian people and hunting dogs. Traditionally Chinese shapes and decoration were the most common for teawares, but here, in the Victorian days of Empire, India was favoured.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Teapot
  • Cover
Materials and Techniques
Earthenware, lead-glazed, transfer-printed, painted and gilded
Brief Description
Earthenware teapot, Burgess & Leigh, Burslem, designed 1896
Physical Description
TEAPOT copying the design of the biscuit tin
Dimensions
  • Height: 16.8cm
  • Width: 24.9cm
  • Depth: 9.5cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Regd shape 281721','Rd.no.285771'printed in brown; applied 'Rd.281' and 'R' impressed on teapot; 'Regd shape 281721' printed in brown, patent '688082', 'B' and 'L' on lid
Gallery Label
British Galleries: This teapot has two registered numbers. The first number protects the shape of the teapot and the second protects the printed design. When Burgess & Leigh made these registrations, they copied a successful design for a biscuit tin which had been sold by Huntley & Palmer since 1894. In this case the legislation protected the original maker and Burgess & Leigh agreed to produce monochrome versions only.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Michael Franklin
Object history
Made by Burgess & Leigh, Middleport Pottery, Burslem, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire
Summary
Object Type
Teapots seemed always to offer scope for the designer's imagination. Some examples used camels, monkeys or people as figures of fun, completely abandoning any relevance and entering the realms of novelty and sometimes of impracticability. This teapot borders on the whimsical and would certainly have provided a topic for conversation at teatime.

Materials & Making
The complex shape added considerably to the difficulties of making and applying the pattern. It was slip-cast in a convoluted mould but the material is earthenware (the cheapest to fire) and the decoration is transfer-printed.

Design & Designing
This highly elaborate teapot shows an Indian scene, with an elephant, British and Indian people and hunting dogs. Traditionally Chinese shapes and decoration were the most common for teawares, but here, in the Victorian days of Empire, India was favoured.
Associated Objects
Collection
Accession Number
C.277&A-1983

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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