Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 125, Edwin and Susan Davies Gallery

Lamp

ca. 1893 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This table lamp is assembled from fairly simple brass parts. Four curved stems supporting a dished conical shade are riveted through balls on to a scalloped base. The stems are held together by three rings. A lamp holder is fixed to the highest ring.

Design & Designing
This brass lamp was probably designed by Arthur Dixon (1856-1929) and was made by the Birmingham Guild of Handicraft, founded by Dixon in 1890. The plain design and simple construction of this lamp must have seemed 'naked' to most Victorian eyes, but endearingly 'honest' and clear to a fellow Arts and Crafts designer such as C.R. Ashbee (1863-1942). He received the lamp as a wedding present from Dixon in 1895.

Places
The first Arts and Crafts metalwork made in Birmingham was produced by the Birmingham Guild of Handicraft. The Guild began by making chased and embossed door furniture. It exhibited at the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society in 1893. The Guild's finger-plates (pieces of metal fastened to doors to prevent finger marks from spoiling the paint work), lockplates and hinges were generally made from flat pieces of brass, copper and gun metal, cut into crisp ogee (S-shaped) outlines and other designs based on 15th- and 16th-century vernacular door furniture. The Guild's traditionalism and reliance on simple outlines in its designs was guided by the austere hand of Arthur Dixon.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Hand-beaten brass
Brief Description
Hand beaten brass, Birmingham, about 1893, probably made by Arthur Dixon
Physical Description
This table lamp is assembled from fairly simple brass parts. Four curved stems supporting a dished conical shade are riveted through balls on to a scalloped base. The stems are held together by three rings. A lamp holder is fixed to the highest ring.
Dimensions
  • Height: 50.5cm
  • Maximum width: 33cm
  • Base depth: 25.8cm
Gallery Label
British Galleries: In 1893 A.S. Dixon set up evening classes in Birmingham teaching beaten metalwork and other handicrafts. Two years later this became the Birmingham Guild of Handicraft. The guild was more commercial than the London-based Guild of Handicraft, but it produced work equally simple in form and finish. Dixon gave this lamp as a wedding present to the architect C.R. Ashbee, founder of the Guild of Handicraft.(27/03/2003)
Credit line
Given by Felicity Ashbee
Object history
Probably designed by Arthur Dixon (born in 1856, died in 1929); made at Birmingham Guild of Handicraft
Summary
Object Type
This table lamp is assembled from fairly simple brass parts. Four curved stems supporting a dished conical shade are riveted through balls on to a scalloped base. The stems are held together by three rings. A lamp holder is fixed to the highest ring.

Design & Designing
This brass lamp was probably designed by Arthur Dixon (1856-1929) and was made by the Birmingham Guild of Handicraft, founded by Dixon in 1890. The plain design and simple construction of this lamp must have seemed 'naked' to most Victorian eyes, but endearingly 'honest' and clear to a fellow Arts and Crafts designer such as C.R. Ashbee (1863-1942). He received the lamp as a wedding present from Dixon in 1895.

Places
The first Arts and Crafts metalwork made in Birmingham was produced by the Birmingham Guild of Handicraft. The Guild began by making chased and embossed door furniture. It exhibited at the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society in 1893. The Guild's finger-plates (pieces of metal fastened to doors to prevent finger marks from spoiling the paint work), lockplates and hinges were generally made from flat pieces of brass, copper and gun metal, cut into crisp ogee (S-shaped) outlines and other designs based on 15th- and 16th-century vernacular door furniture. The Guild's traditionalism and reliance on simple outlines in its designs was guided by the austere hand of Arthur Dixon.
Collection
Accession Number
CIRC.277-1961

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record createdJune 1, 1998
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