Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 54

Engraving

1693 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This print is an engraving, an image made by cutting lines into the surface of a flat piece of metal, inking the plate and then transferring the ink held in the lines onto a sheet of paper.

Subject Depicted
Across the centre of this print is a design for a staircase. The two free-floating elements above and below it are details from the Hampton Court Screen, the most important work in England by the French ironworker Jean Tijou (active in England 1688-1712). The Hampton Court Screen is a magnificent set of 12 highly-ornate, wrought iron panels incorporating symbols of the British Isles and connected by railings; this enclosed the end of the Fountain Garden at Hampton Court Palace. Tijou began it in 1689, it took him three years to make, and he was paid £2,160 for it.

A small part of the Hampton Court Screen almost identical to the detail in the bottom right corner of this print can be seen in the V&A's Ironwork Gallery, Room 114a.

Design & Designing
In 1693, Jean Tijou published a set of 20 prints of his designs for ironwork, which included this one. In the title he explained that the prints depict gates, balconies, staircases, panels etc., mostly either made for William III and Mary II's royal palace at Hampton Court, or the great houses of the English nobility. Tijou states in the title that the prints were 'all for the Use of them that will work Iron in Perfection and with Art', i.e. other craftsmen. This was the first pattern book for ironwork to be published in Britain.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Engraving, ink on paper
Brief Description
Designs for baroque ironwork. Print - Tijou - balustrade & Hampton Court Palace Screen - plate 12
Physical Description
Engraving
Dimensions
  • Excluding mount height: 25.6cm
  • Excluding mount width: 37.3cm
Dimensions checked: Measured; 12/07/1999 by sp
Marks and Inscriptions
Signed 'M. Vander Gucht Sculp:' Lettered 'J. Tijou. In. et del:' and numbered '12'
Gallery Label
British Galleries: Jean Tijou lived in Britain as a religious refugee between 1687 and 1712, creating fine ironwork for Hampton Court Palace, near London, Chatsworth House, Derbyshire and St. Paul's Cathedral, London. From France he introduced decorative Baroque motifs such as scrolling foliage and masks. He was the first person to publish ironwork designs in Britain, in 1693.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Designed by Jean Tijou (born in France, active in England 1688-1712); engraved in London by Michael Vandergucht (born in Antwerp, Belgium 1660, died in London, 1725);

plate 12 from 'A New Book of Drawings...' by Jean Tijou, 1693
Summary
Object Type
This print is an engraving, an image made by cutting lines into the surface of a flat piece of metal, inking the plate and then transferring the ink held in the lines onto a sheet of paper.

Subject Depicted
Across the centre of this print is a design for a staircase. The two free-floating elements above and below it are details from the Hampton Court Screen, the most important work in England by the French ironworker Jean Tijou (active in England 1688-1712). The Hampton Court Screen is a magnificent set of 12 highly-ornate, wrought iron panels incorporating symbols of the British Isles and connected by railings; this enclosed the end of the Fountain Garden at Hampton Court Palace. Tijou began it in 1689, it took him three years to make, and he was paid £2,160 for it.

A small part of the Hampton Court Screen almost identical to the detail in the bottom right corner of this print can be seen in the V&A's Ironwork Gallery, Room 114a.

Design & Designing
In 1693, Jean Tijou published a set of 20 prints of his designs for ironwork, which included this one. In the title he explained that the prints depict gates, balconies, staircases, panels etc., mostly either made for William III and Mary II's royal palace at Hampton Court, or the great houses of the English nobility. Tijou states in the title that the prints were 'all for the Use of them that will work Iron in Perfection and with Art', i.e. other craftsmen. This was the first pattern book for ironwork to be published in Britain.
Collection
Accession Number
25082:9

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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