Photograph thumbnail 1
Photograph thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F

Photograph

1860-1870 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
A stereograph is a pair of photographic images of the same subject taken from slightly different angles. This gives the illusion of a single three-dimensional image when viewed through a stereoscope designed to hold it.

Ownership & Use
Stereographs were mass produced. Viewing them was a popular amusement carried out in the home from the 1850s until the early 20th century. On the reverse of this stereograph is a quote from a poem by William Cowper:

'Tis pleasant through the loopholes of retreat,
To peep at such a world, to see the stir
Of the great Babel, and not feel the crowd'.

The lines refer to the pleasure of viewing this bustling city scene in comfort through a stereoscope (the 'loopholes of retreat') without physically having to jostle with the crowd.

Subjects Depicted
This stereograph is from a series entitled 'Instantaneous Views of London'. The word 'instantaneous' reveals that an important selling-point for such photographs was that they quickly captured a moment in time. In this case the crowd and carriages of a busy London street are frozen in motion.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Albumen prints mounted on glass
Brief Description
Stereoscopic photograph of St Paul's from the foot of Ludgate Hill, made by Underwood & Underwood, New York, USA, 1860 - 1870
Physical Description
Stereoscopic photograph
Dimensions
  • Height: 8.4cm
  • Width: 17.3cm
Marks and Inscriptions
Number 57 from the series 'Instantaneous views of London'
Gallery Label
British Galleries: STEREOSCOPE AND STEREOGRAPHS
Various dates, 1854-1901
This stereoscope is typical of those used in Victorian homes for education and amusement. Stereographs (paired photographs taken from slightly different angles) were placed in the holder and then adjusted until the viewer saw the scene in three dimensions.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Stereoscope made by Underwood & Underwood, New York, USA; stereographs by various photographers
Subjects depicted
Places Depicted
Summary
Object Type
A stereograph is a pair of photographic images of the same subject taken from slightly different angles. This gives the illusion of a single three-dimensional image when viewed through a stereoscope designed to hold it.

Ownership & Use
Stereographs were mass produced. Viewing them was a popular amusement carried out in the home from the 1850s until the early 20th century. On the reverse of this stereograph is a quote from a poem by William Cowper:

'Tis pleasant through the loopholes of retreat,
To peep at such a world, to see the stir
Of the great Babel, and not feel the crowd'.

The lines refer to the pleasure of viewing this bustling city scene in comfort through a stereoscope (the 'loopholes of retreat') without physically having to jostle with the crowd.

Subjects Depicted
This stereograph is from a series entitled 'Instantaneous Views of London'. The word 'instantaneous' reveals that an important selling-point for such photographs was that they quickly captured a moment in time. In this case the crowd and carriages of a busy London street are frozen in motion.
Collection
Accession Number
2211-1955

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
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