Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 56, The Djanogly Gallery

A Triumphal arch

Engraving
1604 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
This print is an engraving, an image made by cutting lines into the surface of a flat piece of metal, inking the plate and then transferring the ink held in the lines onto a sheet of paper.

Subject Depicted
This print records one of the seven temporary wooden triumphal arches built for a formal procession by James I (ruled 1603-1625) through the City of London in 1604. This arch was erected over Fenchurch Street and took more than 40 days to build. It may not have looked exactly like the print because there are some discrepancies between its representation here and contemporary written descriptions of it. In the accompanying text the writer conjures up the atmosphere on the day: 'The gladsome and long-desired Morning at length is come, In which the Streetes seem to be paved with people, that in heapes flocke together'.

Trading
This print was part of a publication called The Arch's of Triumph Erected in honor of the High and mighty prince, James, the first of that name, King, of England, and sixth of Scotland, at his Maiesties Entrance and passage through his Honorable Citty & chamber of London. The City of London had paid for five of the seven temporary arches. They subsidised this publication to ensure that there would be a permanent record of their magnificent gesture.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Engraving, ink on paper
Brief Description
Stephen Harrison (after), 1 of 8 plates, including title plate, from the set of 8 entitled 'The Arch's [sic] of Triumph' depicting the series of temporary arches erected in London on the 15th of March 1604, in honour of James I's ceremonial entrance and passage through the city to Parliament. Engraved by William Kip. London, 1604.
Physical Description
Engraving
Dimensions
  • Excluding mount height: 35.8cm
  • Excluding mount width: 25.8cm
Gallery Label
British Galleries: In 1604 James I went in formal procession through the City of London. This was one of seven temporary arches sponsored by merchants to celebrate the occasion. The arches were set across whole streets, and specially composed speeches and songs were delivered as the procession passed through each of them.(27/03/2003)
Object history
Designed and published in London by Stephen Harrison (active in London 1603), and engraved by William Kip (active in London about 1588-1610)
Subjects depicted
Place Depicted
Summary
Object Type
This print is an engraving, an image made by cutting lines into the surface of a flat piece of metal, inking the plate and then transferring the ink held in the lines onto a sheet of paper.

Subject Depicted
This print records one of the seven temporary wooden triumphal arches built for a formal procession by James I (ruled 1603-1625) through the City of London in 1604. This arch was erected over Fenchurch Street and took more than 40 days to build. It may not have looked exactly like the print because there are some discrepancies between its representation here and contemporary written descriptions of it. In the accompanying text the writer conjures up the atmosphere on the day: 'The gladsome and long-desired Morning at length is come, In which the Streetes seem to be paved with people, that in heapes flocke together'.

Trading
This print was part of a publication called The Arch's of Triumph Erected in honor of the High and mighty prince, James, the first of that name, King, of England, and sixth of Scotland, at his Maiesties Entrance and passage through his Honorable Citty & chamber of London. The City of London had paid for five of the seven temporary arches. They subsidised this publication to ensure that there would be a permanent record of their magnificent gesture.
Collection
Accession Number
14006

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record createdMarch 27, 2003
Record URL