Pair of Boots thumbnail 1
Pair of Boots thumbnail 2
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Pair of Boots

1860s-1870s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Frivolous boots of silk and silk satin, some with high heels, were imported into England from France in the 1860s and 1870s. These French styles were also imitated by English shoemakers. The French influence was due to the stylish Empress Eugenie who had married the French emperor, Napoleon III, in 1853. She was probably responsible for the introduction of the shorter skirt which led to a greater emphasis on stockings and shoes.

Additionally, by about 1860 chemical aniline dyes were widely available. Many of the colours they provided were rather gaudy. The bright yellow of this pair of boots forms a striking contrast with the black braid.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Boot
  • Boot
Materials and Techniques
Leather sole, and uppers of silk satin with applied silk braid
Physical Description
Pair of ladies' satin boots with applied braid
Credit line
Given by Messrs Harrods Ltd.
Summary
Frivolous boots of silk and silk satin, some with high heels, were imported into England from France in the 1860s and 1870s. These French styles were also imitated by English shoemakers. The French influence was due to the stylish Empress Eugenie who had married the French emperor, Napoleon III, in 1853. She was probably responsible for the introduction of the shorter skirt which led to a greater emphasis on stockings and shoes.



Additionally, by about 1860 chemical aniline dyes were widely available. Many of the colours they provided were rather gaudy. The bright yellow of this pair of boots forms a striking contrast with the black braid.
Associated Object
Collection
Accession Number
T.588&A-1913

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record createdMarch 13, 2003
Record URL