Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Ceramics, Room 137, The Curtain Foundation Gallery

ewer and lid

Ewer
19th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The ewer was bought for the South Kensington Museum by Caspar Purdon Clarke on a purchasing trip to India in the winter of 1881-82. It was made at the Bombay School of Art, which produced ceramicstraded under the name of 'Wonderland Art Pottery' under the direction of George Wilkins Terry, the School's first drawing master who had been appointed in 1857. The pottery flourished from the mid 1870s until about 1890. Early wares such as these were influenced by those manufactured in Sind, because Terry set up his workshop under the direction of a Sindhi craftsman called Nur Muhammad.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Ewer
  • Lid
Materials and Techniques
Glazed earthenware
Brief Description
Glazed earthenware ewer, Bombay School of Art, 19th century
Physical Description
Ewer and stopper in the 'Sind' shape and style of ornament. The decoration comprises bands of floral decoration, and conventional flowering plants in compartments on the narrow neck all in dark green on a bright green gound.
Dimensions
  • Height: 14in
  • Maximum diameter: 7in
Style
Object history
Bought for the South Kensington Museum by Caspar Purdon Clarke on a purchasing trip to India, 1881-82
Historical context
The Bombay School of Art's ceramic productions were traded under the name of 'Wonderland Art Pottery' under the direction of George Wilkins Terry, who had been appointed as its first drawing master in 1857. The pottery flourished from the mid 1870s until about 1890, but limped on after Terry's retirement at that time into the the early years of the 20th century. Early wares were influenced by those manufactured in Sind as Terry set up his workshop with a Sindhi craftsman called Nur Muhammad. Soon, however, much of the decoration came to be influenced by the cave paintings at Ajanta, which had been discovered earlier in the century, and were copied by the Schools students over a period lasting from 1872-1885, elements of which were adapted and used to decorate the ceramics in an attempt to encourage traditions of Indian art rather than European ones. Liberty imported some wares to sell in its Regent Street shop in London See Stronge, Susan,'Wonderland', Ceramics: The International Journal of Ceramics and Glass, London, issue V, August 1987, pp. 48-53.
Production
Bombay School of Art
Summary
The ewer was bought for the South Kensington Museum by Caspar Purdon Clarke on a purchasing trip to India in the winter of 1881-82. It was made at the Bombay School of Art, which produced ceramicstraded under the name of 'Wonderland Art Pottery' under the direction of George Wilkins Terry, the School's first drawing master who had been appointed in 1857. The pottery flourished from the mid 1870s until about 1890. Early wares such as these were influenced by those manufactured in Sind, because Terry set up his workshop under the direction of a Sindhi craftsman called Nur Muhammad.
Collection
Accession Number
IS.2862-1883

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdMarch 12, 2003
Record URL