Okina Inari Shrine at Nihonbashi thumbnail 1
Okina Inari Shrine at Nihonbashi thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Okina Inari Shrine at Nihonbashi

Woodblock Print
ca. 1843-1844 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This aizuri or monochrome blue uchiwa-e (rigid fan print) design by Hiroshige is interesting for the way it is made up of three smaller fan designs showing views of popular religious sites in Edo. The Okina Inari Shrine (left) was a small site situated to the immediate south-east of Nihonbashi, the bridge that was the geographical and symbolic centre of both Edo and Japan as a whole. One of scores of shrines in Edo and the Kanto hinterland dedicated to the harvest god Inari, it enjoyed a spell of intense popularity in the late 1830s for the good luck it was believed to bring to those who visited and gave offerings. The Myoken Hall (centre) was situated in the north-east part of the Honjo district next to where the Yanagishima Bridge, seen here from the north, crossed the Yokojukkengawa Canal at its meeting-point with the Kitajukkengawa Canal. Part of the Honshoji Temple complex, it was named after the image of the Bodhisattva Myoken that it housed. This was the focus of a religious cult subscribed to by large numbers of Edo residents, including Hiroshige's contemporary Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849). The Ryodaishi Hall (left), set in expansive wooded surroundings, was located next to the Chief Priest's Residence of the Kan'eiji Temple in the north-east corner of Edo's Shitaya district. It was the memorial hall of Tenkai, also known as Jigen Daishi, who founded the temple in 1625 as the Edo equivalent of the Enryakuji temple complex on Mount Hiei to the north-east of Kyoto, the former capital situated in south-west Japan.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Additional Titles
  • Myoken Hall at Yanagishima (assigned by artist)
  • Ryodaishi Hall at Ueno (assigned by artist)
Materials and Techniques
Colour print from woodblocks
Brief Description
Woodblock print, Utagawa Hiroshige I; 'Okina Inari Shrine at Nihonbashi', 'Myoken Hall at Yanagishima', 'Ryodaishi Hall at Ueno'; fan print, Japanese, about 1843-1844
Physical Description
Fan print, aiban size. Artist signature: Hiroshige ga. Publisher mark: Ibaya Kyubei.
Dimensions
  • Approx. height: 220mm
  • Approx. width: 290mm
Style
Credit line
Webb Bequest
Place Depicted
Summary
This aizuri or monochrome blue uchiwa-e (rigid fan print) design by Hiroshige is interesting for the way it is made up of three smaller fan designs showing views of popular religious sites in Edo. The Okina Inari Shrine (left) was a small site situated to the immediate south-east of Nihonbashi, the bridge that was the geographical and symbolic centre of both Edo and Japan as a whole. One of scores of shrines in Edo and the Kanto hinterland dedicated to the harvest god Inari, it enjoyed a spell of intense popularity in the late 1830s for the good luck it was believed to bring to those who visited and gave offerings. The Myoken Hall (centre) was situated in the north-east part of the Honjo district next to where the Yanagishima Bridge, seen here from the north, crossed the Yokojukkengawa Canal at its meeting-point with the Kitajukkengawa Canal. Part of the Honshoji Temple complex, it was named after the image of the Bodhisattva Myoken that it housed. This was the focus of a religious cult subscribed to by large numbers of Edo residents, including Hiroshige's contemporary Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849). The Ryodaishi Hall (left), set in expansive wooded surroundings, was located next to the Chief Priest's Residence of the Kan'eiji Temple in the north-east corner of Edo's Shitaya district. It was the memorial hall of Tenkai, also known as Jigen Daishi, who founded the temple in 1625 as the Edo equivalent of the Enryakuji temple complex on Mount Hiei to the north-east of Kyoto, the former capital situated in south-west Japan.
Collection
Accession Number
E.4925-1919

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record createdMarch 7, 2003
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