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Women of Britain Come into the Factories

Poster
1941 (published)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

This poster was part of the 'call-up' effort to bring British women into war work in December 1941. It echoes the archetypal image of the Soviet proletarian woman and has a graphic trace of the mood of egalitarianism which was marked in wartime Britain, as well as a possible reference to the popular alliance agreed with the Soviet Union in July 1941.

Object details

Categories
Object type
TitleWomen of Britain Come into the Factories (assigned by artist)
Materials and techniques
Colour lithograph
Brief description
Poster by Philip Zec entitled 'Women of Britain come into the factories'. UK, 1941.
Physical description
Portrait format poster printed in colours predominantly pale red, brown and black on white ground. Figure of a young blonde woman in brown factory overall and headkerchief, nearly full length with outstretched arms, looking up to sky.In the background a flight of aircraft move upward into the sky from behind distant factory buildings. Captioned at bottom.
Dimensions
  • Sheet height: 750mm
  • Sheet width: 494mm
Styles
Production typeMass produced
Marks and inscriptions
Zec (Signature; within the image; lithography)
Credit line
Given by Ogilvy Benson & Mather Ltd
Production
Recruiting poster issued by the Ministry of Information. Probably published 1941.

Reason For Production: Commission
Subjects depicted
Summary
This poster was part of the 'call-up' effort to bring British women into war work in December 1941. It echoes the archetypal image of the Soviet proletarian woman and has a graphic trace of the mood of egalitarianism which was marked in wartime Britain, as well as a possible reference to the popular alliance agreed with the Soviet Union in July 1941.
Collection
Accession number
E.135-1973

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Record createdMarch 4, 2003
Record URL
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