Crystal Palace Transept, Hyde Park thumbnail 1
Crystal Palace Transept, Hyde Park thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case MB2A, Shelf DR80, Box LOANS

Crystal Palace Transept, Hyde Park

Photograph
1852 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
The Great Exhibition included photography classified in both the science and the fine art sections. This photograph of the exhibition building shows the vast enclosure which is virtually empty except for an elm tree which was accommodated during the construction.

Materials & Making
Benjamin Brecknell Turner (1815-1894) began practising photography in 1849 according to the technique patented in 1841 by the British inventor W. H. Fox Talbot (1800-1877). Turner's photographs were 'contact' printed from paper negatives (known as 'calotypes') of the same size, 27 by 39 centimetres. He printed them on 'albumen' paper made by suspending light sensitive silver salts in an emulsion of egg white.

Places
The interior of the Crystal Palace is shown at Hyde Park in March 1852, shortly after the closure of the Great Exhibition and prior to the dismantling of the structure that year for its rebuilding at Sydenham in South London.

Ownership & Use
Turner compiled 60 photographs, including this one, in what is believed to be a unique album, 'Photographic Views from Nature'. It might have been made as a sample book, a convenient method of storing and presenting photographs for personal pleasure and showing to colleagues or potential exhibitors. It remained in the Turner family until 1982 when it was bought by the Museum.
interact Benjamin Brecknell Turner's 'Photographic Views from Nature'
read Benjamin Brecknell Turner – working methods
object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Albumen print from calotype (waxed paper) negative
Brief Description
Photograph by Benjamin Brecknell Turner, 'Crystal Palace Transept, Hyde Park', 1852, albumen print
Physical Description
Photograph depicting the interior of the Crystal Palace, Hyde Park. There is a tree contained within the structure.
Dimensions
  • Height: 42.4cm
  • Width: 56cm
  • Framed height: 58cm
  • Framed width: 68cm
  • Framed depth: 2.5cm
  • Image height: 26.3cm
  • Image length: 39.3cm
Dimensions unframed checked: Measured; 08/09/2000 by PaperCons Dimensions previously given as 47 x 57
Gallery Label
British Galleries: This photograph shows the interior of the Crystal Palace at Hyde Park shortly after the closure of the Great Exhibition and prior to the dismantling of the structure for its re-building at Sydenham. The Great Exhibition included a significant showing of photography which was classified with both the sciences and the fine art sections.(27/03/2003)
Place Depicted
Summary
Object Type
The Great Exhibition included photography classified in both the science and the fine art sections. This photograph of the exhibition building shows the vast enclosure which is virtually empty except for an elm tree which was accommodated during the construction.

Materials & Making
Benjamin Brecknell Turner (1815-1894) began practising photography in 1849 according to the technique patented in 1841 by the British inventor W. H. Fox Talbot (1800-1877). Turner's photographs were 'contact' printed from paper negatives (known as 'calotypes') of the same size, 27 by 39 centimetres. He printed them on 'albumen' paper made by suspending light sensitive silver salts in an emulsion of egg white.

Places
The interior of the Crystal Palace is shown at Hyde Park in March 1852, shortly after the closure of the Great Exhibition and prior to the dismantling of the structure that year for its rebuilding at Sydenham in South London.

Ownership & Use
Turner compiled 60 photographs, including this one, in what is believed to be a unique album, 'Photographic Views from Nature'. It might have been made as a sample book, a convenient method of storing and presenting photographs for personal pleasure and showing to colleagues or potential exhibitors. It remained in the Turner family until 1982 when it was bought by the Museum.
Bibliographic Reference
Roger Taylor, Impressed by Light: British photographs from paper negatives, 1840-1860 New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art ; Washington : National Gallery of Art ; New Haven ; London : Yale University Press, c2007. 9781588392251 (Metropolitan Museum of Art (hc)) 1588392252 (Metropolitan Museum of Art (hc)) 9780300124057 (Yale University Press (hc)) 0300124058 (Yale University Press (hc)).
Collection
Accession Number
PH.1-1982

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record createdFebruary 25, 2003
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