The River Teme at Downton, Herefordshire thumbnail 1
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level F , Case TOPIC, Shelf 13, Box A

The River Teme at Downton, Herefordshire

Drawing
1785-1786 (drawn)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This watercolour is an example of the ‘picturesque’, an aesthetic concept that evolved in late 18th century Britain. The ‘picturesque’ landscape was rough, varied and irregular. This work is typical of the style, with its river, rocks, winding path and rustic bridge supported by tree trunks.

The writer and collector Richard Payne Knight (1750-1824) employed Thomas Hearne (1744-1817) to draw several views of the grounds of his country house, Downton Castle. Knight was an enthusiast of the ‘picturesque’ style of painting and landscape gardening.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Indian ink and sepia
Brief Description
Indian ink and sepia drawing entitled 'The river Teme at Downton, Herefordshire' by Thomas Hearne. Great Britain, ca. 1785-1786.
Physical Description
Indian ink and sepia drawing depicting a view of a wooded glen at Downton, Herefordshire, formerly the seat of Richard Payne Knight (1750-1824). Signed.
Dimensions
  • Height: 32cm
  • Width: 35cm
Style
Credit line
Given by William Smith
Subjects depicted
Place Depicted
Summary
This watercolour is an example of the ‘picturesque’, an aesthetic concept that evolved in late 18th century Britain. The ‘picturesque’ landscape was rough, varied and irregular. This work is typical of the style, with its river, rocks, winding path and rustic bridge supported by tree trunks.



The writer and collector Richard Payne Knight (1750-1824) employed Thomas Hearne (1744-1817) to draw several views of the grounds of his country house, Downton Castle. Knight was an enthusiast of the ‘picturesque’ style of painting and landscape gardening.
Collection
Accession Number
2933-1876

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record createdFebruary 11, 2003
Record URL