Woven Silk thumbnail 1
Not currently on display at the V&A

Woven Silk

1550-1600 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This is an example of the most prestigious type of Ottoman silk textile. It is known in Turkish as a seraser, indicating that the cloth is faced 'from end to end' by expensive gold or silver thread. Here the silver ground has a striking pattern of roundels worked in red and green and set in staggered rows. The realistic cypress and rose-buds help to date this piece. They were introduced in the 1550s, so this textile must have been made after that time.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Woven silk, the ground faced with wefts of metal thread
Brief Description
Fragment of silk with metal thread, decorated with roundels formed of cypress- and rosebud-motifs, Turkey (probably Bursa), 1550-1600.
Physical Description
Fragment of silk with metal thread, decorated with roundels formed of cypress- and rosebud-motifs, Turkey (probably Bursa), 1550-1600.
Dimensions
  • Length: 128.5cm
  • Width: 72.5cm
  • Weight: 4.6kg
including backboard
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
Gallery Label
Jameel Gallery Cloth of Silver Turkey, probably Bursa 1550-1600 The lavish use of silver-wrapped thread in the weft of this piece is a feature of seraser fabrics, the most highly prized of all Ottoman textiles. The design - staggered roundels filled with stylised cypress trees alternating with rose buds - is a rare variation on the usual repetition of medallions. Silk and metal-wrapped thread in taqueté weave Museum no. 835-1904(2006-2012)
Summary
This is an example of the most prestigious type of Ottoman silk textile. It is known in Turkish as a seraser, indicating that the cloth is faced 'from end to end' by expensive gold or silver thread. Here the silver ground has a striking pattern of roundels worked in red and green and set in staggered rows. The realistic cypress and rose-buds help to date this piece. They were introduced in the 1550s, so this textile must have been made after that time.
Bibliographic References
  • Nurhan Atasoy and others, Ipek: The Crescent & the Rose. Imperial Ottoman Silks and Velvets, London: Azimuth Editions, 2001, figs 90/B/i and 110.
  • Tim Stanley (ed.), with Mariam Rosser-Owen and Stephen Vernoit, Palace and Mosque: Islamic Art from the Middle East, London, V&A Publications, 2004pp.58, 64
Collection
Accession Number
835-1904

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record createdFebruary 4, 2003
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