Not currently on display at the V&A

Pull

Print
1974 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

The American Robert Rauschenberg (born 1925) is one of the most inventive and influential artists of his era. His work is not only about, but literally made with, contemporary culture. His trademark sculptures, known as 'combines', are just that - objects from everyday life fixed together, often with an application of paint - in unlikely, but thought-provoking combinations. This principle was subsequently brought into play when he began making prints. He was one of the first artists to transfer photographic images onto canvas and paper, which gives images such as Pull a sense of contact with the world of newspapers, advertising and mass media. He extended this contact with reality by incorporating actual objects, such as the paper bag we see floating from the diver's right arm, and using layers of cloth (muslin and taffeta) to give the image both movement and a visual indistinctness that is implicit in the central image of the Olympic diver.

Object details

Categories
Object type
TitlePull (assigned by artist)
Materials and techniques
Screenprint on cheesecloth and silk taffeta, with paper bag collage
Brief description
Robert Rauschenberg. 'Pull', from a series of prints entitled Hoarfrost Series, 1974
Physical description
Birds-eye view of a male figure diving into blue water, with border images
Dimensions
  • Approx. height: 226cm
  • Approx. width: 122cm
Production typeLimited edition
Copy number
21/29. From a series of nine prints entitled Hoarfrost Editions
Marks and inscriptions
  • Rauschenberg 74 (Signature;date; chalk)
  • 21/29
Subjects depicted
Summary
The American Robert Rauschenberg (born 1925) is one of the most inventive and influential artists of his era. His work is not only about, but literally made with, contemporary culture. His trademark sculptures, known as 'combines', are just that - objects from everyday life fixed together, often with an application of paint - in unlikely, but thought-provoking combinations. This principle was subsequently brought into play when he began making prints. He was one of the first artists to transfer photographic images onto canvas and paper, which gives images such as Pull a sense of contact with the world of newspapers, advertising and mass media. He extended this contact with reality by incorporating actual objects, such as the paper bag we see floating from the diver's right arm, and using layers of cloth (muslin and taffeta) to give the image both movement and a visual indistinctness that is implicit in the central image of the Olympic diver.
Bibliographic references
  • Lambert, Susan. Prints : Art and Techniques. London : V&A Publications, 2001. p 9 : ill.
  • Timmers, Margaret (ed), Impressions of the Twentieth Century: Fine Art Prints from the V&A's Collection, London, V&A Publications, 2001
Collection
Accession number
E.551-1975

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Record createdDecember 21, 2002
Record URL
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