Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level E , Case MB6R, Shelf W, Box 15

Ornament and inlay for furniture

Drawing
1860-1900 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

John Dibblee Crace first came to public notice through his Gothic- and Renaissance-style furniture for the International Exhibition of 1862. His clients included the 4th Marquess of Bath for whom he redocorated Longleat, and William Waldorf Astor who commissioned him to decorate Cliveden (ca. 1895).

The Crace family were the most important firm of interior decorators working in Britain in the 19th century. They worked for every British monarch from George III to Queen Victoria and on a range of buildings that includes royal palaces, Leeds Town Hall and the Great Exhibition building of 1862.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Pencil and tint
Brief Description
Design of ornament and inlay for furniture, by J.D Crace. Great Britain, ca. 1860-1900.
Physical Description
Design for furniture. Signed by the artist.
DimensionsVarious sizes
Object history
Presented by J.D. Crace
Summary
John Dibblee Crace first came to public notice through his Gothic- and Renaissance-style furniture for the International Exhibition of 1862. His clients included the 4th Marquess of Bath for whom he redocorated Longleat, and William Waldorf Astor who commissioned him to decorate Cliveden (ca. 1895).



The Crace family were the most important firm of interior decorators working in Britain in the 19th century. They worked for every British monarch from George III to Queen Victoria and on a range of buildings that includes royal palaces, Leeds Town Hall and the Great Exhibition building of 1862.
Bibliographic References
  • Megan Aldrich, The Craces: royal decorators 1768-1899, London, Murray, 1990.
  • Victoria and Albert Museum, Department of Engraving, Illustration and Design, Accessions 1912, London, Printed for His Majesty’s Stationery Office 1913
Collection
Accession Number
E.1942-1912

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record createdJune 30, 2009
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