Nu de profil sur une chaise longue (Le Grand Bois) thumbnail 1
Nu de profil sur une chaise longue (Le Grand Bois) thumbnail 2
+4
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case MB2A, Shelf DR111

Nu de profil sur une chaise longue (Le Grand Bois)

Woodcut
1906 (printed)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This print was made shortly after Matisse's paintings caused a furore at the Salon d'Automne, Paris, in 1905. The largest and most arresting of three woodcuts by Matisse in the same period, it translates the vigour of his colourful Fauve period paintings into black and white. The block from which the image was printed consists of two thick, joined planks of fruit-wood, from which Matisse cut away the unwanted wood around the design with knives, chisels and gouges, leaving the stark lines, dashes and dots standing in relief. It is the only known surviving woodblock he cut. It was acquired by the art dealer Frank Perls from the French print publisher Ambroise Vollard, famous for his editions of fine prints by many leading artists. Throughout its history, woodcut has been a leading medium in mass communication, and this association, along with the direct simplicity woodcuts offer, led a number of artists to revive its use in the early 20th century. Matisse may also have been drawn to woodcut because of its affinities with sculpture, another medium in which he was experimenting at the same time.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Woodcut on laid van Gelder paper
Brief Description
Print by Henri Matisse, 'Nu de profil sur une chaise longue (Le Grand Bois) [Nude in Profile on a Chaise Longue (The Large Woodcut)]', woodcut laid on van Gelder paper, France, 1906
Physical Description
Female seated nude in profile, printed in black.
Dimensions
  • Printed surface height: 47.8cm
  • Printed surface width: 38cm
  • Sheet height: 57.5cm
  • Sheet width: 46cm
Dimensions taken from Victoria and Albert Museum Department of Prints, Drawings and Paintings Accession Register for 1994
Production typeLimited edition
Copy Number
10/50
Marks and Inscriptions
  • Henri matisse 10/50 (Signed in pencil)
  • Lugt 1344a (blind stamped)
Credit line
Purchased with Art Fund support
Object history
This print was examined under a microscope with a raking light by Victoria Button in Paper Conservation in December 2010. Button found definite indentations that confirm this impression is indeed a woodcut.
Subjects depicted
Summary
This print was made shortly after Matisse's paintings caused a furore at the Salon d'Automne, Paris, in 1905. The largest and most arresting of three woodcuts by Matisse in the same period, it translates the vigour of his colourful Fauve period paintings into black and white. The block from which the image was printed consists of two thick, joined planks of fruit-wood, from which Matisse cut away the unwanted wood around the design with knives, chisels and gouges, leaving the stark lines, dashes and dots standing in relief. It is the only known surviving woodblock he cut. It was acquired by the art dealer Frank Perls from the French print publisher Ambroise Vollard, famous for his editions of fine prints by many leading artists. Throughout its history, woodcut has been a leading medium in mass communication, and this association, along with the direct simplicity woodcuts offer, led a number of artists to revive its use in the early 20th century. Matisse may also have been drawn to woodcut because of its affinities with sculpture, another medium in which he was experimenting at the same time.
Associated Object
E.609-1975 (Object)
Bibliographic References
  • Timmers, Margaret (ed.) Impressions of the 20th century : fine art prints from the V&A collection. London: V&A Publications, 2001. ISBN 185177350.
  • Victoria and Albert Museum Department of Prints, Drawings and Paintings Accession Register for 1994
  • Baker, Malcolm, and Brenda Richardson (eds.), A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London: V&A Publications, 1999.
Collection
Accession Number
E.276-1994

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdDecember 6, 2002
Record URL