Desk

1925 (made)
Desk thumbnail 1
Desk thumbnail 2
+1
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This desk was exhibited at the Paris Art Deco exhibition of 1925. Although its shimmering silver surfaces are typically Art Deco in style, its simplified kneehole desk form and its bun feet are features of traditional British furniture. Edward Maufe designed this desk for the Paris exhibition, but we do not know the exact details of how it was commissioned. Maufe's wife, Prudence, was chief buyer for Heal's department store in London, which was known for pioneering modern furniture. She was responsible for the arrangement of the British Government Pavilion at the Art Deco exhibition.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Mahogany carcase, with ebony writing and top surfaces, gessoed and gilded with white gold, with haldu wood footrest and feet, and ivory, rock crystal and silk handles
Dimensions
  • Height: 107cm
  • Width: 134.3cm
  • Depth: 53cm
Style
Credit line
Given by Prudence, Lady Maufe
Object history
Object sampling carried out by Jo Darrah, V&A Science; drawer/slide reference 6/5.
Subject depicted
Summary
This desk was exhibited at the Paris Art Deco exhibition of 1925. Although its shimmering silver surfaces are typically Art Deco in style, its simplified kneehole desk form and its bun feet are features of traditional British furniture. Edward Maufe designed this desk for the Paris exhibition, but we do not know the exact details of how it was commissioned. Maufe's wife, Prudence, was chief buyer for Heal's department store in London, which was known for pioneering modern furniture. She was responsible for the arrangement of the British Government Pavilion at the Art Deco exhibition.
Bibliographic Reference
Wilk, Christopher, ed. . Western Furniture 1350 to the Present Day. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1996. p.202-3, ill. ISBN 085667463X.
Collection
Accession Number
Circ.898-1968

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdNovember 27, 2002
Record URL