Dressing Table

ca. 1919-1923 (made)
Dressing Table thumbnail 1
Dressing Table thumbnail 2
+3
images
Not currently on display at the V&A

Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The form of this dressing table is loosely based on early 19th century examples. They too had a pivoting mirror attached to a table top. Here the contrasting ivory and ebony inlay of the top creates the illusion of a fine textile draped over the table. This is an amusing reference to the orgins of the first type of dressing table, called a toilette in French. The name came from the linen (toile in French) on which the mirror, brush and other objects sat. Ruhlmann often used this kind of illusionistic inlay in his designs. Other typical features of his work are rich and exotic materials and stylised surface decoration.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 6 parts.

  • Dressing Table
  • Mirror
  • Drawer
  • Drawer
  • Drawer
  • Key
Materials and Techniques
Oak carcase, veneered with Andaman padouk (on base and vase) and purpleheart (on top and mirror back), with solid purpleheart columns, inlaid with ivory and ebony, and mahogany drawers, and silvered bronze mirror frame and fittings
Dimensions
  • Height: 119cm
  • Width: 76cm
  • Depth: 52.5cm
Style
Subject depicted
Summary
The form of this dressing table is loosely based on early 19th century examples. They too had a pivoting mirror attached to a table top. Here the contrasting ivory and ebony inlay of the top creates the illusion of a fine textile draped over the table. This is an amusing reference to the orgins of the first type of dressing table, called a toilette in French. The name came from the linen (toile in French) on which the mirror, brush and other objects sat. Ruhlmann often used this kind of illusionistic inlay in his designs. Other typical features of his work are rich and exotic materials and stylised surface decoration.
Bibliographic Reference
Wilk, Christopher, ed. . Western Furniture 1350 to the Present Day. London: Victoria and Albert Museum, 1996. 230p., ill. ISBN 085667463X.
Collection
Accession Number
W.14:1 to 6-1980

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record createdNovember 27, 2002
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