Waldybag thumbnail 1
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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
Not currently on display at the V&A
On short term loan out for exhibition

Waldybag

Handbag and Purse
early 1950s (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The unusual decorative technique for this luxury evening bag was developed and executed by Florence Campbell, who also designed for Rayne shoes, and sold by H. Wald & Co. after the Second World War. Minuscule glass beads were applied to the flowers while the paint was still wet, creating a glistening, textured effect. These handbags were popular with the British royal family. Known as 'Waldybags', they were in complete contrast to the special shoulder bags designed to carry personal gas masks (compulsory in Britain throughout 1939-1945) that Wald & Co. had made during the War.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Painted satin decorated with glass beads and silk
Brief Description
Handbag, purse, painted satin, beads, silk, 'Waldybag' by H Wald & Co., England, 1950s
Physical Description
Cream satin evening 'Waldybag' handbag with painted and glass-beaded flower motif and a captive silk purse. British, 1950-1954, made by Wald & Co.
Gallery Label
'Waldybags' made by H Wald & Co. were popular in England in the 1940s and ‘50s. Company designer Florence Campbell adapted the traditional German craft of fabric-painting by applying beads. She started by painting designs onto transparent plastic sheets to hold against plain satin bags, enabling clients to choose a pattern and style. The design was traced onto greaseproof paper, then transferred to the bag by pricking the paper to create an outline. Campbell would finish by directly hand-painting the bag. V&A, Room 40, Bags: Inside Out. (12/2020)
Credit line
Given by Deborah Wald
Summary
The unusual decorative technique for this luxury evening bag was developed and executed by Florence Campbell, who also designed for Rayne shoes, and sold by H. Wald & Co. after the Second World War. Minuscule glass beads were applied to the flowers while the paint was still wet, creating a glistening, textured effect. These handbags were popular with the British royal family. Known as 'Waldybags', they were in complete contrast to the special shoulder bags designed to carry personal gas masks (compulsory in Britain throughout 1939-1945) that Wald & Co. had made during the War.
Bibliographic Reference
Bags V&A Exhibition (Project)Bags: Inside Out (2020) Lucia Savi, V&A Publishing, pg 27
Collection
Accession Number
T.536-1996

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record createdNovember 12, 2002
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