Bartmann Jug thumbnail 1
Bartmann Jug thumbnail 2
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
British Galleries, Room 58b

Bartmann Jug

ca. 1540 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

Object Type
A wide-mouthed stoneware vessel of this type would have been known to its German maker as a Krug, a word that was applied to general-purpose mugs or jugs without any kind of pinched pouring lip. In the 16th century stoneware vessels designed specifically for pouring liquids had tall spouts, like a modern coffee pot. It is therefore safe to assume that this particular pot was used for drinking beer.

Historical Associations
In 1545 Henry VIII was watching the English fleet fighting the French off Portsmouth, Hampshire. His much-loved flagship, Mary Rose, attempted a complicated manoeuvre, keeled over and vanished beneath the waves, taking most of its crew with it. The half of the ship that settled into the silt was preserved with all its contents. It was raised in the 1980s. Modern research has established that the Mary Rose, a veteran warship already some years old, had recently been fitted with additional heavy bronze guns. It is thought that a sudden gust of wind, aggravated by the extra weight of the guns, caused the ship to roll, allowing water to rush in through the open gun ports.

Materials & Making
German salt-glazed stoneware, the toughest ceramic material available, was especially favoured for heavy-duty applications, such as kitchens, rowdy taverns and for sea travel. The barber-surgeon's cabin on the Mary Rose contained several plain stoneware pots with heavy thumbed bases, used as drug jars.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Salt-glazed stoneware, with applied moulded decoration
Brief Description
Bartmann jug with moulded oak-leaf decoration and bearded mask, Cologne, Germany, ca. 1540.
Physical Description
Bartmann jug with moulded oak-leaf decoration and bearded mask. Salt-glazed stoneware with applied moulded decoration.
Dimensions
  • Height: 20cm
  • Including handle width: 14.5cm
Dimensions checked: measured; 20/01/1999 by sp
Gallery Label
  • British Galleries: STONEWARE BOTTLE AND MUG
    Imports of German stonewares into England from Frechen and Cologne expanded greatly in the 16th century. By 1600 at least 100,000 pieces were coming into London annually. This bottle or 'Bartmann' ('bearded man', from the moulded face on the neck) was perhaps the most common type of ceramic imported from the Rhineland from 1600 to 1670. The smaller jug was recovered near the wreck of Henry VIII's flagship, the 'Mary Rose' off Portsmouth, Hampshire.(27/03/2003)
  • Gothic Mug About 1510-1525 This mug or jug comes from the wreck of the Mary Rose, Henry VIII's Flagship which went down in 1545. It was probably used by the officers rather than the crew. Ceramics of this kind, with bearded masks and oak leaves or roses, were made in the Rhineland and exported all over northern Europe. Stoneware Made in Cologne V&A: C.9-2002 Cat. 199(2003)
Object history
This example was recovered from near the wreck of the Mary Rose and is almost certainly from the ship.

Made in Cologne, Germany
Historical context
Wide-mouthed vessls of this type, with applied trailing oak-leaf of rose decoration and Bartmann mask, are typical of the Cologne stonewares imported into England in the second quarter of the 16th Century. Serving as either jug or mug, they could be used for many purposes and at almost any social level.
Production
Recovered from the sunken ship, The Mary Rose
Subjects depicted
Summary
Object Type
A wide-mouthed stoneware vessel of this type would have been known to its German maker as a Krug, a word that was applied to general-purpose mugs or jugs without any kind of pinched pouring lip. In the 16th century stoneware vessels designed specifically for pouring liquids had tall spouts, like a modern coffee pot. It is therefore safe to assume that this particular pot was used for drinking beer.

Historical Associations
In 1545 Henry VIII was watching the English fleet fighting the French off Portsmouth, Hampshire. His much-loved flagship, Mary Rose, attempted a complicated manoeuvre, keeled over and vanished beneath the waves, taking most of its crew with it. The half of the ship that settled into the silt was preserved with all its contents. It was raised in the 1980s. Modern research has established that the Mary Rose, a veteran warship already some years old, had recently been fitted with additional heavy bronze guns. It is thought that a sudden gust of wind, aggravated by the extra weight of the guns, caused the ship to roll, allowing water to rush in through the open gun ports.

Materials & Making
German salt-glazed stoneware, the toughest ceramic material available, was especially favoured for heavy-duty applications, such as kitchens, rowdy taverns and for sea travel. The barber-surgeon's cabin on the Mary Rose contained several plain stoneware pots with heavy thumbed bases, used as drug jars.
Bibliographic References
  • Townsend, Colin D. Pots from the Mary Rose. Ceramic Review. Jan/Feb 1984, no.85.
  • Marks, R & Williamson, P. (Eds.), Gothic. Art for England 1400-1547, London, V&A, 2003
Other Number
LOAN:EVERITT 1 - Previous loan number
Collection
Accession Number
C.9-2002

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record createdMay 31, 2002
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