Bracelet thumbnail 1
Bracelet thumbnail 2
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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Jewellery, Rooms 91, The William and Judith Bollinger Gallery

Bracelet

500-300 BC (made), before 1925 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This bracelet may have been in the Castellani firm's stock for a number of years as the business was winding down in the 20th century.

Ancient beads, scarabs and engraved gemstones from excavations were an essential element of jewellery made in the archaeological style. Mounted in gold, they were densely set in necklaces, bracelets, brooches, earrings or rings.

Castellani, the leading jewellers in Rome, acquired ancient stones in great quantities from many sources. The scarcity of scarabs caused Augusto Castellani to comment in 1862 that their high price ‘impelled the moderns to counterfeit them. And they so perfected this trade that the most experienced eye can barely discover the deception’.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Gold decorated with applied wirework and granulation, mounted with four carnelian scarabs
Brief Description
Gold bracelet in the Etruscan style, mounted with four cornelian scarabs, by Castellani, Rome, before 1925
Physical Description
Gold bracelet decorated with applied wirework and granulation, and mounted with four cornelian scarabs. With the applied monogram of Castellani.
Dimensions
  • Height: 4.3cm
  • Width: 7.1cm
  • Depth: 8.4cm
Style
Credit line
Given by the family of Ernest and Antoinette Jones
Object history
The scarabs: 500-300 BC. With the applied monogram of Castellani. Bought by Ernest and Antoinette Jones from Alfredo Castellani in Rome in 1925.



Castellani Jewellery Exhibition RF.2003/302
Production
The scarabs are Etruscan, 500-300 BC
Subjects depicted
Summary
This bracelet may have been in the Castellani firm's stock for a number of years as the business was winding down in the 20th century.



Ancient beads, scarabs and engraved gemstones from excavations were an essential element of jewellery made in the archaeological style. Mounted in gold, they were densely set in necklaces, bracelets, brooches, earrings or rings.



Castellani, the leading jewellers in Rome, acquired ancient stones in great quantities from many sources. The scarcity of scarabs caused Augusto Castellani to comment in 1862 that their high price ‘impelled the moderns to counterfeit them. And they so perfected this trade that the most experienced eye can barely discover the deception’.
Collection
Accession Number
M.35-2001

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record createdDecember 19, 2001
Record URL