Daybed thumbnail 1
Daybed thumbnail 2
+47
images
Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Europe 1600-1815, Room 3

This object consists of 2 parts, some of which may be located elsewhere.

Daybed

about 1750 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This day-bed (veilleuse) was made by Jean-Baptiste Tilliard. Tilliard was one of the most prominent Parisian chair-makers during the middle of the eighteenth century who executed much work for the Crown. Several members of the family worked as cabinet makers in Paris during the century. When Jean-Baptiste retired in 1764 his son assumed control of the workshop and continued to use his father’s stamp.

The day-bed has all the hallmarks of the then popular rococo style, with its serpentine form and decorative scheme comprising carved sprays of flowers that alternate with rocaille shells and cartouches.

The arms of the marquise de Pompadour have been added to the back rail of the daybed; this was probably done in the early twentieth century. Madame de Pompadour, who became the official mistress of Louis XV in 1745, was celebrated as a collector and arbiter of taste for much of the nineteenth century. The addition of her arms to this piece reflects the contemporary fascination with Madame de Pompadour – attempting to turn the daybed into a Pompadour relic.




object details
Category
Object Type
Parts
This object consists of 2 parts.

  • Daybed
  • Upholstery Sample
Materials and Techniques
carved and gilded wood
Brief Description
Daybed of carved and gilded wood, by Jean-Baptiste Tilliard, upholstered in modern chiné silk with rose-like flowers and blue stripes. The frame is carved with rococo motifs, with the arms of Madame de Pompadour added as a cresting

Physical Description
Day-bed (veilleuse) with frame of carved and gilded wood, with upholstery (including loose cushions) of chiné silk with a design of rose-like flowers between blue stripes. The day-bed is raised on nine cabriole legs on volute feet. The day-bed is of serpentine form carved with sprays of flowers alternating with rocaille shells and cartouches. The back is brought round to enclose each end. The serpentine top rail is carved with bunches of flowers and rocaille scroll work en suite with the lower rail. A rocaille cartouche at the head has been removed at a later date and an heraldic shield carved with the arms of the Marquise de Pompadour substituted (azure, three towers argent).



Dimensions
  • Maximum, at head end height: 106cm
  • Length: 5'11"ft
  • At top of head end depth: 80cm
  • At back corner of foot end (cluster of flowers) height: 74.5cm
cm measurements taken on 5 March 2009 and later. Inch measurements are older (presumably taken from green cats).
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
TILLIARD (Stamped on front face of long back seat rail (between middle and head end))
Gallery Label
  • Daybed 1745–55 With its elegant sweeping back, curved sides and asymmetrical form, this seat epitomises the Rococo style. It is the antithesis of the severe rectilinear furniture favoured by the previous generation. The seat was made to accommodate one person reclining or two people sitting. It was intended for intimate conversation and relaxation, rather than for sleeping. France (Paris) By Jean-Baptiste Tilliard I Gilded wood; modern upholstery Given by Sir Chester Beatty, FSA, LLD, DSc in memory of his wife (09/12/2015)
  • [Label text by Peter Thornton] DAY BED (veilleuse) FRENCH (Paris); about 1750 Carved and gilded beechwood; the gilding largely renewed and the upholstery modern On the cresting is a shiled bearing the arms of the marquise de Pompadour; this is a later addition Stamped Tilliard Jean-Baptiste Tilliard I (1686-1766) was the most eminent member of one of the best-known dynasties of chair-makers (menuisiers) in Paris during the middle of the 18th century. He executed much important work for the Crown, some of best was carved by the sculptor Roumier and gilded by Bardou. He retired in 1764 yielding his workshops to his son, Jean-Baptiste Tilliard II, who used the same stamp. Given by Sir Chester Beatty, FSA, LLd, DSc W.5-1956(1980)
Credit line
Bequeathed by Edith Beatty to Sir Alfred Chester Beatty, by whom given to the Museum in her memory
Object history
Given to the Museum by Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (Nominal File: Sir Alfred Chester Beatty, RF number 56/1711). It was noted that Sir Alfred's furniture had been catalogued by Francis Watson of the Wallace Collection and it is presumably from him that it is noted 'there is no definite proof that it belonged to the Marquise de Pompadour as the carving of her arms on the front of the frame is most probably added at a later date. At that time, according to notes on the file it was upholstered in 'floral silk brocade'. This, with the pair of chairs (W.6 and W.7-1956, donated at the same time) were shown almost immediately in the New Acquisitions Court.



In the 1970s it was reupholstered with green velvet. When this was removed in 2015 to re-upholster the daybed for the new Europe Galleries; a small sample of this covering was archived.
Summary
This day-bed (veilleuse) was made by Jean-Baptiste Tilliard. Tilliard was one of the most prominent Parisian chair-makers during the middle of the eighteenth century who executed much work for the Crown. Several members of the family worked as cabinet makers in Paris during the century. When Jean-Baptiste retired in 1764 his son assumed control of the workshop and continued to use his father’s stamp.



The day-bed has all the hallmarks of the then popular rococo style, with its serpentine form and decorative scheme comprising carved sprays of flowers that alternate with rocaille shells and cartouches.



The arms of the marquise de Pompadour have been added to the back rail of the daybed; this was probably done in the early twentieth century. Madame de Pompadour, who became the official mistress of Louis XV in 1745, was celebrated as a collector and arbiter of taste for much of the nineteenth century. The addition of her arms to this piece reflects the contemporary fascination with Madame de Pompadour – attempting to turn the daybed into a Pompadour relic.





Bibliographic References
  • Alcouffe, Daniel, Geoffrey de Bellaigue, Christian Baulez, Denise Ledoux-Lebard, Il Mobile Francese dal Medievo al 1925. Milan: Gruppo Editoriale Fabbri, 1981, illl. p. 63
  • Zoe Allen, Xavier Bonnet, Philip James and Leela Meinertas, 'The Triumph of Comfort:re-upholstering Europe 1600-1815. Luxury, vol. 4, issues 2 and 3 (2017), pp. 271-286, this daybed illustrated as figs. 3 and 4 and the principles behind its re-upholstery.
  • Salmon, Xavier, Madame de |Pompadour et les arts, Paris, Réunion des musées nationaux, 2002
Collection
Accession Number
W.5:1,2-1956

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest Feedback

record createdNovember 27, 2001
Record URL