Trade Embroidery thumbnail 1
Trade Embroidery thumbnail 2
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Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
South Asia, Room 41

Trade Embroidery

early 18th century (made)
Place Of Origin

Indian trade embroideries were luxury textiles designed to appeal to the tastes of consumers abroad. Merging elements of both European and Indian aesthetics, Indian trade embroideries for Britain were imported from the 17th to the 19th century and used in both furnishings and dress. This fabric’s design mimics heavy English crewel work, but the extremely fine silk chain-stitching is characteristic of Gujarat. It would have been used as furnishing fabric, possibly as part of a set of bed-hangings.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Cotton embroidered with silk in chain-stitch, stitched with a straight needle
Brief Description
Hanging, cotton embroidered with silks, Gujarat for the western market, early 18th century; Textiles
Physical Description
Hanging of cotton embroidered with silks. Two rectangular panels of cream cotton base fabric sewn together, with large vertical multi-coloured scrolling floral design in straight-needle worked chain stitch. Each petal on the largest blossoms filled with different patterns.
Dimensions
  • Length: 183cm
  • Width: 173cm
  • Length: 72in
  • Width: 68in
Gallery Label
TRADE EMBROIDERY Cotton embroidered with silk Gujarat, for the western market Early 18th century Trade embroideries were luxury textiles designed to appeal to the tastes of consumers abroad. Merging elements of both European and Indian aesthetics, Indian trade embroideries for Britain were imported from the 17th to the 19th century and used in both furnishings and dress. This fabric’s design mimics heavy English crewel work, but the extremely fine silk chain-stitching is characteristic of Gujarat.(01/08/2017)
Subject depicted
Summary
Indian trade embroideries were luxury textiles designed to appeal to the tastes of consumers abroad. Merging elements of both European and Indian aesthetics, Indian trade embroideries for Britain were imported from the 17th to the 19th century and used in both furnishings and dress. This fabric’s design mimics heavy English crewel work, but the extremely fine silk chain-stitching is characteristic of Gujarat. It would have been used as furnishing fabric, possibly as part of a set of bed-hangings.
Bibliographic Reference
Indian embroidery / Rosemary Crill ; photography by Richard Davis. London: V&A Publications, 1999 Number: 185177310X, 1851772944 (pbk.)p.26, cat. no.4.
Collection
Accession Number
IS.298-1951

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record createdSeptember 17, 2001
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