Not currently on display at the V&A

Rag Rug Waistcoat

Waistcoat
1990 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

The designer John Allen machine-knitted cotton and silk sari strips to create this colourful waistcoat. His equipment was a Brother single-bed domestic knitting machine. He then cut the floats generated by a weave-knit structure to give a three-dimensional textured effect. The edges are bound with navy ribbon.

John Allen was instrumental in setting up and running the knitting department at the Royal College of Art, London. He was an influential teacher whose pupils include many notable knitters, including Patricia Roberts and Freddie Robins.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Cotton yarn and silk strips machine knit by hand and hand sewn
Physical Description
Navy cotton yarn and multicolour imitation Sari silk strips machine knit by hand on a Brother single bed domestic knitting machine. The technique used is one developed by the designer. Floats generated by a weave knit structure, are cut to create the three-dimensional textured effects. The edges are bound with navy ribbon.
Dimensions
  • Neck to hem length: 51cm
  • Across chest width: 49cm
Tension: 8 stitches per inch 3.5 stitches per cm
Production typeUnique
Credit line
Given by the maker
Summary
The designer John Allen machine-knitted cotton and silk sari strips to create this colourful waistcoat. His equipment was a Brother single-bed domestic knitting machine. He then cut the floats generated by a weave-knit structure to give a three-dimensional textured effect. The edges are bound with navy ribbon.



John Allen was instrumental in setting up and running the knitting department at the Royal College of Art, London. He was an influential teacher whose pupils include many notable knitters, including Patricia Roberts and Freddie Robins.
Bibliographic Reference
John Allen and Carin E.M Reinders, eds. Slipstitch+ new concepts in knitting, Dutch Textile Museum, Tilberg, 2000
Collection
Accession Number
T.229-2001

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record createdJuly 26, 2001
Record URL