Not currently on display at the V&A

Chair

ca. 1807 (designed), ca. 1892 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This chair was probably made by Edwards and Roberts, a firm who are first listed in the 1854 Kelly’s Post Office Directory of London and described as “antique and modern cabinet makers and importers of ancient furniture”. This chair bears an imitation ivory label stamped EDWARDS & ROBERTS, 148-160 WARDOUR ST, 532 OXFORD ST. LONDON. It is therefore likely that is was made after 1892, as this is when the firm occupied premises at these locations. The firm specialised in reproductions of earlier styles.

The chair closely follows a design by Thomas Hope illustrated in Household Furniture published in 1807. As such it is an example of the Regency Revival in the decorative arts, popular in the second half of the nineteenth century. Typical Regency features include the use of palmette and star motifs, in this case achieved using inlaid brass.


object details
Category
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Mahogany with inlaid decoration of brass and ebony
Dimensions
  • Height: 85.2cm
  • Maximum width: 58.4cm
  • Maximum depth: 59.7cm
dimensions taken from departmental green catalogues
Style
Marks and Inscriptions
EDWARDS & ROBERTS, 148-160 WARDOUR ST, 532 OXFORD ST. LONDON (The 'Content' is stamped onto a white imitation ivory label located on the back seat rail.)
Gallery Label
  • Based upon a design by Thomas Hope (1769-1831) Made by Edwards & Roberts, London Mahogany with brass inlay This is part of the same suite as the table shown nearby (W.29-1964) and bears the same label, showing that it was made between 1892 and 1895. This chair is closely based upon a design published by Thomas Hope in his celebrated book Household Furniture of 1806. An Edwards and Roberts suite exists which includes chairs and tables of this type, as well as a wine cooler and other items of dining-room furniture, all of similar design including the distinctive brass palmettes and stars so popular in Regency Revival pieces of this date.(1993)
  • 4. CHAIR About 1892 The chair is modelled on designs published by Thomas Hope in Household Furniture and Interior Decoration. The London firm of Edwards & Roberts made suites of furniture, including chairs, tables and wine coolers, using Hope’s designs. Hope’s love of antique motifs included the lyre, anthemion or honeysuckle, Greek key and star decoration on this chair. [55 words] Mahogany with inlaid decoration of brass and ebony Made by Edwards & Roberts, London Stamped onto a white imitation ivory label on the back seat rail ‘EDWARDS & ROBERTS, 148-160 WARDOUR ST, 532 OXFORD ST. LONDON’ Museum no. W.29-1976(2008)
Credit line
Given by Sir Colin Anderson
Object history
The design of lyre-back chairs originated in classical Greece and Rome.
Production
The chair was made by Edwards & Roberts in about 1892 based on designs by Thomas Hope published in 1807
Summary
This chair was probably made by Edwards and Roberts, a firm who are first listed in the 1854 Kelly’s Post Office Directory of London and described as “antique and modern cabinet makers and importers of ancient furniture”. This chair bears an imitation ivory label stamped EDWARDS & ROBERTS, 148-160 WARDOUR ST, 532 OXFORD ST. LONDON. It is therefore likely that is was made after 1892, as this is when the firm occupied premises at these locations. The firm specialised in reproductions of earlier styles.



The chair closely follows a design by Thomas Hope illustrated in Household Furniture published in 1807. As such it is an example of the Regency Revival in the decorative arts, popular in the second half of the nineteenth century. Typical Regency features include the use of palmette and star motifs, in this case achieved using inlaid brass.
Collection
Accession Number
W.29-1976

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record createdJuly 26, 2001
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