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Crinolette

  • Place of origin:

    Great Britain (made)

  • Date:

    ca. 1870 (made)

  • Artist/Maker:

    Unknown

  • Materials and Techniques:

    Spring steel hoops, covered in striped cotton, fastened and adjusted with metal eyelets and tapes

  • Credit Line:

    Given by Messrs Harrods Ltd.

  • Museum number:

    T.775C-1913

  • Gallery location:

    On display at Erarta Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art, St Petersburg, Russia

By 1865 the outline of the fashionable dress changed. The shape at the back of the body grew more exaggerated with a distinctive flattening at the front. Crinolettes, or half-crinolines, marked the mid-point between the cage crinoline and the bustle. They often had extra loops of steel, which acted as a bustle.

Some crinolettes laced like a corset. The wearer used this lacing and internal tapes to adjust the shape of the bustle and the width of petticoat. Gaps in the tape made it possible to remove some of the steels when washing the petticoat.

Physical description

Black and white striped cotton, and covered spring steel; black cotton braid edging. Internal tapes allow for the adjustable shaping of both the bustle and the width of petticoat. Open fronted with scalloped edge.

Place of Origin

Great Britain (made)

Date

ca. 1870 (made)

Artist/maker

Unknown

Materials and Techniques

Spring steel hoops, covered in striped cotton, fastened and adjusted with metal eyelets and tapes

Object history note

Given by Messrs. Harrods Ltd

Historical significance: This is an important example of a crinolette as it shows the changing shape of the female silhouette in the 1870s

Labels and date

The crinolette

By 1870, fashionable skirts had more volume at the back and were gathered into elaborate drapes and folds. This new style required a new foundation garment.

The crinolette, also known as a half-crinoline, was flat fronted and provided support at the rear. It was more versatile than the full crinoline because its shape could be modifiedby adjustable internal ties.

Crinolette
Britain, about 1870
Spring steel and cotton trimmed with cotton braid
V&A: T.775C-1913
Given by Messrs Harrods Ltd
[16/04/2016-12/03/2017]
CRINOLETTE (front left)
Spring steel hoops covered in black and white striped cotton
British, about 1870

CRINOLETTE (front right)
Spring steel frame covered in white cotton
British, 1868

By 1865, the shape of the crinoline at the back of the body grew more exaggerated with a distinctive flattening at the front. Crinolettes, or half-crinolines, marked the mid-point between the cage crinoline and the bustle. They were often made with extra loops of steel, which acted as a bustle.

Some crinolettes were laced like a corset. This lacing, combined with the tying of internal tapes, enabled the shape of the bustle and the width of petticoat to be adjusted. Gaps in the tape made it possible to remove some of the steels when washing the petticoat.

Given by Messrs. Harrods Ltd
T. 775C -1913

T.194-1984 []

Materials

Steel; Cotton

Techniques

Hand stitched

Categories

Fashion; Europeana Fashion Project

Collection

Textiles and Fashion Collection

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