Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level D , Case MD, Shelf 32

Textile Design

c.1960 (made)
Artist/Maker
Place Of Origin

This design shows the rear view of a woman and five little girls in black felt-tipped pen on an acetate film overlay to be superimposed on a drawing of the same figures in green, blue and yellow merging into the background pattern of these colours. The coloured drawing acts as a foundation. When the acetate film is laid on top of the foundation drawing then the figures look complete. The Czechoslovakian, Jacqueline Groag, emigrated to England where she worked as a textile designer. Her use of outline drawings on acetate film over a coloured drawing as a foundation creates a layered effect in this design for a printed textile. The layers simulate textile printing using a sequence of impressions. There is a similar design for a textile entitled 'Dolls Galore' which is in the collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum.


object details
Categories
Object Type
Materials and Techniques
Black felt-tipped pen on an acetate film overlay to be superimposed on a drawing in coloured felt-tipped pens on paper
Brief Description
Jacqueline Groag. Textile design showing a woman with five little girls, similar to "Dolls Galore" British, c.1960.
Physical Description
Rear view of a woman and five little girls in black felt-tipped pen on an acetate film overlay to be superimposed on a drawing of the same figures in green, blue and yellow merging into the background pattern of these colours. The foundation drawing is in coloured felt-tipped pens. When the acetate film is laid on top of the foundation drawing then the figures look complete. The female figures look like dolls.
Dimensions
  • Height: 36.6cm
  • Width: 27cm
Marks and Inscriptions
'Jacqueline' (Signature in black felt-tipped pen on the botton right of the acetate film.)
Credit line
Given by Margaret Timmers
Object history
This design was given to Margaret Timmers, Senior Curator, Prints, Drawings and Paintings Department by an executor of the estate of Jacqueline Groag.
Subject depicted
Summary
This design shows the rear view of a woman and five little girls in black felt-tipped pen on an acetate film overlay to be superimposed on a drawing of the same figures in green, blue and yellow merging into the background pattern of these colours. The coloured drawing acts as a foundation. When the acetate film is laid on top of the foundation drawing then the figures look complete. The Czechoslovakian, Jacqueline Groag, emigrated to England where she worked as a textile designer. Her use of outline drawings on acetate film over a coloured drawing as a foundation creates a layered effect in this design for a printed textile. The layers simulate textile printing using a sequence of impressions. There is a similar design for a textile entitled 'Dolls Galore' which is in the collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum.
Bibliographic Reference
The following excerpt is taken from Galloway, Francesca, 'Post-War British Textiles'. Robert Marcuson Publishing, London, 2002: "Jacqueline Groag, a Czech by birth, was a talented textile designer, as well-known and as influential as [Lucienne] Day in the 1950s; she continued designing textiles until the 1980s. Groag was a student of Josef Hoffmann and Franz Cizek in Vienna and designed for the Wiener Werkstätte before moving to Paris in 1929. There she designed dress fabrics for Chanel, Schiaparelli and Lanvin. She married the architect and follower of Adolf Loos, Jacques Groag, whose preference for severe functionalism in architecture had some influence on her style. They moved to London in 1939 where her success must have been immediate given the number of textiles she designed for the 'Britain Can Make It' exhibition at the V&A in 1946. The columnar design, launched by David Whitehead for the Festival of Britain in 1951, was adapted from an earlier design commissioned from Groag by the Rayon Design Centre in 1948."
Collection
Accession Number
E.943-2000

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record createdMarch 1, 2001
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