Image of Gallery in South Kensington
On display at V&A South Kensington
Request to view at the Prints & Drawings Study Room, level C , Case GG, Shelf 156, Box B

Memorial card for Albert

Print
1861 (made)
Artist/Maker

Death was highly visible in Victorian culture. It was a time for communal feeling, studied response and ritual. People were encouraged to give public expression to their grief, and an industry of mourning dress and mementoes provided visible reminders of the dead.

The death of Prince Albert in 1861 contributed to the cult of mourning that lasted for much of the 19th century. Part of the ritual was to send out beautifully embossed mourning cards in memory of the deceased. This card for Prince Albert, intended for a wide public, was mounted in a cheap frame for display in a modest room.


object details
Category
Object Type
Additional TitlePrinted ephemera from the estate of M.Franklin
Materials and Techniques
Embossed paper-lace, lithograph and letterpress.
Brief Description
Memorial Card for Prince Albert, printed by J.T.Wood.
Physical Description
Memorial card for Albert, the Prince Consort (1819-1861). Printed by Wood, letterpress printed by J.T.Wood, 278, Strand, London.Lettered Sacred to the Memory of H.R.H. Prince Albert, Consort of Her Majesty, Queen Victoria, etc., and with four lines of verse and the name of the printer. Embossed Wood.
DimensionsMeasurements: 7.6 x 11.5 cm.
Gallery Label
Anonymous Memorial card for Prince Albert [roman, not italics] 1861 The death of Prince Albert in 1861 contributed to the cult of mourning that lasted for much of the 19th century. Part of the ritual was to send out beautifully embossed mourning cards in memory of the deceased. This card for Prince Albert, intended for a wide public, was mounted in a cheap frame for display in a modest room. [60 words] Embossed paper-lace, lithograph and letterpress Printed by J.T. Wood(December 2006)
Credit line
Bequeathed by M. J. Franklin
Object history
Wood, London, letterpress printed by J.T.Wood, 278, Strand, London
Summary
Death was highly visible in Victorian culture. It was a time for communal feeling, studied response and ritual. People were encouraged to give public expression to their grief, and an industry of mourning dress and mementoes provided visible reminders of the dead.



The death of Prince Albert in 1861 contributed to the cult of mourning that lasted for much of the 19th century. Part of the ritual was to send out beautifully embossed mourning cards in memory of the deceased. This card for Prince Albert, intended for a wide public, was mounted in a cheap frame for display in a modest room.
Collection
Accession Number
E.1505-1987

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record createdJuly 27, 2000
Record URL