Jacket thumbnail 1
Jacket thumbnail 2
Not currently on display at the V&A

Jacket

19th century (made)
Artist/Maker
Place of origin

Jacket of green silk embroidered in red silk in chain and satin stitches. The lining is of red check printed cotton. Bell-shaped body, overlapping on the front, with large opening for the neck, partly filled in by an embroidered panel. Pocket-slits on either side, over the hips. Straight and tubular sleeves. The ornament is worked on the front, the back, the sleeves, and down the sides and bottom. The principal motive is a plain 'cone' form repeated in single close rows, but on the front, the back and the sleeves, it radiates round discs and hexagons.

Object details

Categories
Object type
Materials and techniques
Silk embroidered in silk, and lined with printed cotton
Brief description
Boy's jacket of silk embroidered in silk, Sindh, 19th century
Physical description
Jacket of green silk embroidered in red silk in chain and satin stitches. The lining is of red check printed cotton. Bell-shaped body, overlapping on the front, with large opening for the neck, partly filled in by an embroidered panel. Pocket-slits on either side, over the hips. Straight and tubular sleeves. The ornament is worked on the front, the back, the sleeves, and down the sides and bottom. The principal motive is a plain 'cone' form repeated in single close rows, but on the front, the back and the sleeves, it radiates round discs and hexagons.
Dimensions
  • Length: 22.5in
  • Cuff to cuff width: 86cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Chest measured inside garment circumference: 60cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Across back width: 25cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Nape hem length: 54cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Sleeve length underarm to cuff length: 26cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Shoulder to cuff length: 29cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
  • Cuff measured inside garment circumference: 19cm (Note: Measured by Conservation)
Gallery label
  • CHILDREN'S GARMENTS Kutch and the neighbouring area of Sindh (now in Pakistan) form one of the richest areas for embroidery in South Asia. The stitching done by women in this region is for their own and their families’ use, while male embroiderers create pieces for sale. Different groups use different stitches and patterns. These identify the community of the wearer as well as demonstrate the embroiderer’s skill. Boy’s jacket (kediyun) Cotton embroidered with silk and mirror-work Rabari community, Kutch, Gujarat, 1950–70 V&A: IS.7-2008 Child’s dress (angarkha) Silk embroidered with silk Jat community, Sindh, Pakistan, about 1900 Given by Lady Ratan Tata V&A: IM.280-1920 Child’s dress (kurta) Silk embroidered with floss silk Memon community, Sindh, Pakistan, about 1900 V&A: 49-1908(03/10/2015-10/01/2016)
  • Kutch and the neighbouring area of Sindh (now in Pakistan) form one of the richest areas for embroidery in South Asia. The stitching done by women in this region is for their own and their families’ use, while male embroiderers create pieces for sale. Different groups use different stitches and patterns. These identify the community of the wearer as well as demonstrate the embroiderer’s skill. Boy’s jacket (kediyun) Cotton embroidered with silk and mirror-work Rabari community, Kutch, Gujarat, 1950–70 V&A: IS.7-2008 Child’s dress (angarkha) Silk embroidered with silk Jat community, Sindh, Pakistan, about 1900 Given by Lady Ratan Tata V&A: IM.280-1920 Child’s dress (kurta) Silk embroidered with floss silk Memon community, Sindh, Pakistan, about 1900 V&A: 49-1908(03/10/2015-10/01/2016)
Credit line
Given by Lady Ratan Tata, York House, Twickenham
Object history
Navajbai Sett (1877- 1965), the younger daughter of Ardeshir Merwanji Sett, or Lady Ratan Tata gave the collection of her husband Sir Ratan Tata (1871- 1918) in 1920 to the V&A. The collection was distributed across the Indian Section and the then departments of architecture, ceramics, metalwork, paintings, textiles, and woodwork.

Sir Ratan Tata was a great art collector, and although he collected often to decorate the several residences he had in England, India and France, he also pursued his collecting interests specifically on these trips. He was interested in Chinese and Japanese works which he acquired in the countries as well as in European paintings, ceramics, and Indian textiles and crafts. Among the items acquired in 1920 were many that were housed at Sir and Lady Tata’s residence, York House in Twickenham. When Sir Ratan Tata died, the Executors of his estate offered his collection to the Prince of Wales Museum (now the CSMVS), Bombay (now Mumbai) in 1920. It was in the same year that she gave parts of the collection to the V&A.

Given by Lady Ratan Tata, York House, Twickenham. This acquisition information reflects that found in the Museum records (Asia Department registers and/or Central Inventory) as part of a 2023 provenance research project.

R.P. 1920-6471
Collection
Accession number
IM.280-1920

About this object record

Explore the Collections contains over a million catalogue records, and over half a million images. It is a working database that includes information compiled over the life of the museum. Some of our records may contain offensive and discriminatory language, or reflect outdated ideas, practice and analysis. We are committed to addressing these issues, and to review and update our records accordingly.

You can write to us to suggest improvements to the record.

Suggest feedback

Record createdJune 25, 2009
Record URL
Download as: JSONIIIF Manifest